TAP Blog

Professors Daniel Solove and Neil Richards explain how the recent case of Google v. Vidal-Hall in the UK shows that US tort ideas are influencing EU law.
NYU’s Information Law Institute and Center on Law and Security explore issues related to government access to data in the cloud. This post provides a summary of a roundtable discussion that tackled topics such as warrants vs. subpoenas in the digital context, transborder government access to data stored in the cloud, and the legality of broad government surveillance.
Professor Daniel Spulber, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, examines two pieces of patent legislation, The Innovation Act (H.R.9) and the STRONG Patents Act (S.632). Professor Spulber shows that one threatens to weaken the patent system while the other one could strengthen it.
Professor Deirdre Mulligan, UC Berkeley School of Information, argued that regulation of privacy through technology has both benefits and costs. Privacy by design was the topic of the final panel at the 4th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley.
Leading practitioners of privacy law from law firms and technology companies shared practical lessons from their work. Working with privacy regulators and the tension between businesses’ responsibilities to their customers and to the government in data protection were among the topics covered. This is the fourth report in a 5-part series from the 4th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley.
Professor Danielle Keats Citron advocates for a stronger legal and social response to the problems of online bullying, cyberharassment, and nonconsensual pornography, a.k.a. “revenge porn.” This is the third of a 5-part series of posts from the 4th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley.
Privacy lawyers need to understand the nature of the FTC and how to interact with it as it pursues privacy enforcement actions. This is the second report in a 5-part series from the 4th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley.
Key insights from BCLT’s panel discussion on data security. This is the first of a 5-part series of posts from the 4th Annual BCLT Privacy Law Forum: Silicon Valley.
Economics professor Nicholas Economides explains why the Federal Communications Commission’s recent decision regarding net neutrality will protect the free flow of content on the Internet and ensure fair competition.
In “Precinct or Prejudice? Understanding Racial Disparities in New York City's Stop-and-Frisk Policy,” Sharad Goel, Justin M. Rao, and Ravi Shroff bring statistical analysis to the civil rights concerns that are raised over the police policy known as "stop-and-frisk.”
Professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, examines the value of broadband competition, and questions if it would make net neutrality regulations redundant.
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