TAP Blog

Matthew Gentzkow and his colleagues at Stanford and New York University report from their study on the way Facebook affects a range of individual and social welfare measures.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are hosting a symposium to discuss the full array of implications that “deep fakes” have on our society.
In honor of Data Privacy Day, TAP highlights some of the recent work from scholars who are thought-leaders with privacy technology-policy issues.
University of California, Berkeley professor Chris Hoofnagle looks beyond the platform-advertiser relationship at Facebook and Google, and examines the developer-platform incentives within these companies.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
Professor Heidi Williams is lauded by The Economist for her pursuit of a "more rigorous understanding of technological progress in medicine and health care."
In an op-ed article written for The Washington Post, Professors Woodrow Hartzog and Neil Richards explain why the current online privacy ecosystem in the U.S. is failing; and, they encourage policymakers to “redefine itself as the country that protects the trust that people give to companies.”
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove provides his list of notable books on privacy and security from 2018.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2018.
Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, Boston University, argue that AI can be the basis of two types of technological progress: automation and enhancement; and they show that “there is scope for public policy to ensure that resources are allocated optimally between the two in order to ensure fulfillment of AI’s potential for growth, employment, and prosperity.”
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove outlines the findings from the New York Attorney General’s investigation into Oath’s violation of COPPA.
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