TAP Blog

University of Florida law professor Daniel Sokol and Stanford University Fellow Chirantan Chatterjee examine the risk of cybersecurity vulnerabilities within merger and acquisition activity.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
A new paper by Santa Clara University’s Eric Goldman and Northeastern Law’s Jessica Silbey provides a roadmap to distinguish the legitimate and illegitimate bases for protecting privacy via copyright.
A new study by MIT economic professor Erik Brynjolfsson and his colleagues Avinash Collis and Felix Eggers puts a dollar value on all those free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP someday.
In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein outlines the internet infrastructure trends from the recent past, and shows how they’ve evolved to support the modern digital economy.
Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.
Harvard cyber and international law professor Jonathan Zittrain talks with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about privacy, autonomy, and information fiduciaries.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
Matthew Gentzkow and his colleagues at Stanford and New York University report from their study on the way Facebook affects a range of individual and social welfare measures.
Results 1 - 10 of 993
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|