TAP Blog

New research by Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom shows that while the uptake of cloud computing by new firms has slowed, companies are ramping up their spending on the technology.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove shares his interview with cybersecurity and data privacy experts from Beazley about the issue of profiling and the GDPR.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron explains how digital technology magnifies the harm from violations of sexual privacy in two new articles, “Sexual Privacy” and “Deep Fakes: A Looming Challenge for Privacy, Democracy, and National Security”.
Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.
Matthew Slaughter, Dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, discusses how place-based “heartland” visas could help arrest the decline of high-skilled workers in America.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove outlines why the U.S. does not currently have a comprehensive privacy law; and, he provides a practical path to establish federal oversight for privacy and security protections.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
University of Florida law professor Daniel Sokol and Stanford University Fellow Chirantan Chatterjee examine the risk of cybersecurity vulnerabilities within merger and acquisition activity.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
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