TAP Blog

Posts by Eric Goldman
A new paper by Santa Clara University’s Eric Goldman and Northeastern Law’s Jessica Silbey provides a roadmap to distinguish the legitimate and illegitimate bases for protecting privacy via copyright.
Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.
For the past couple of years, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman has been delving into all things emojis. This post rounds up all of his work on emojis and the law to date.
Santa Clara University professor Eric Goldman offers a list of some of the identified errors and major ambiguities in the recently passed California Consumer Privacy Act. This post also provides additional resources for learning more about the bill.
Eric Goldman, Co-Director of the Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, provides conference highlights to insightful conversations from leaders of user-generated content websites. Video links are included.
Eric Goldman, Co-Director of the Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, and his colleague Jeff Kosseff, US Naval Academy, introduce a series of essays about the seminal Internet law case, Zeran v. AOL.
Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute Director Eric Goldman discusses the anti-SLAPP ruling in a case where the plaintiff wanted negative Facebook posts about his business removed.
Eric Goldman, Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University, introduces The Atlantic essay series he helped organize. Topics covered include voting, journalism, privacy and surveillance.
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman examines a paradox presented in the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA): while the DTSA provides an important development in intellectual property law, the statute says it “shall not be construed to be a law pertaining to intellectual property for purposes of any other Act of Congress.”
The first part of the Consumer Review Fairness Act takes effect next week. Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman provides an overview of the new law, and focuses primarily on issues with anti-review clauses.
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