Looking Forward: What Challenges Does Copyright Face in the Twenty-First Century?

By TAP Staff

Posted on June 10, 2010


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This post is provided by Tara Wheatland, Copyright Research Fellow, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology at Berkeley Law School.

On April 9-10, 2010, The Berkeley Center for Law and Technology hosted a conference entitled Copyright @ 300: Looking Back at the Statute of Anne and Looking Forward to Challenges of the Future. This post presents a recap of one of many interesting and thought-provoking panels at the conference.

Read the entire conference summary:
 


The final panel of the conference turned to the future of copyright law.  Professor Pam Samuelson, of UC Berkeley Law School, addressed the topic of copyright reform, outlining the benefits and drawbacks of pursuing reform in a variety of venues, including Congress, the courts, the Copyright Office, and legal academia.  Professor Samuelson also discussed her own recent efforts with the Copyright Principles Project to articulate some normative principles of a “good” copyright law, to analyze the ways in which current copyright law is and is not in alignment with these principles, and to make some recommendations for copyright reform in order to make U.S. law more consistent with these principles. 

Jeremy Williams, Deputy General Counsel of Warner Brothers Entertainment, Inc., also addressed the topic of copyright reform, focusing on the need to promote respect for copyright law, on the part of creators, intermediaries, and users alike, in order to ensure the continued health of this important law.  Mr. Williams suggested that focusing the system on enforcement via intermediaries, as opposed to individual users, would go a long way towards promoting the perception of legitimacy of the copyright system. 

Professor Tim Wu of Columbia Law School addressed the phenomenon of tolerated use as something of an informal safety valve on ever-increasing copyright protections.  Andrew Bridges, an attorney with Winston & Strawn, LLP, proposed the provocative question: is copyright law obsolete?  Mr. Bridges outlined numerous alternative ways to obtain copyright-like protections without resort to copyright law itself.  
 

  • Panel mp3
  • Eric Goldman, Santa Clara University Law School (moderator)
  • Pamela Samuelson, BCLT & UC Berkeley School of Law - pdf
  • Jeremy Williams, Warner Brothers Entertainment, Inc.
  • Andrew Bridges, Winston & Strawn LLP - pdf
  • Tim Wu, Columbia Law School - pdf

This post is provided by Tara Wheatland, Copyright Research Fellow, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology at Berkeley Law School.
 


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