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Artificial Intelligence

TAP scholars consider AI’s effects on labor, business, policing, law, medicine, war, free speech, privacy and democracy, and assess proposals to limit harms.

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Rochester Institute of Technology philosophy professor Evan Selinger and his Future of Privacy Forum colleague Brenda K Leong argue that technology companies “should ensure their ethics boards are guided by universal human rights.”
Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are hosting a symposium to discuss the full array of implications that “deep fakes” have on our society.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, Boston University, argue that AI can be the basis of two types of technological progress: automation and enhancement; and they show that “there is scope for public policy to ensure that resources are allocated optimally between the two in order to ensure fulfillment of AI’s potential for growth, employment, and prosperity.”
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Quote

New Laws of Robotics Needed to Tackle AI: Expert

Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally-inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.

Frank Pasquale
AFP/ Yahoo News
May 16, 2019

Featured Article

SIRI-OUSLY 2.0: What Artificial Intelligence Reveals about the First Amendment

Machines that can actually think are referred to as strong Artificial intelligence (AI). The First Amendment might protect speech by strong AI. Courts focused on the value of speech to listeners and the need to constrain government power will be sympathetic to this view.

By: Margot Kaminski, Helen Norton, Toni M. Massaro