Issues

Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

TAP Blog

Is Social Graph Portability Workable?

Professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, discusses a proposal to advocate for social graph portability rather than regulation or antitrust when dealing with market power issues that arise from platforms like Facebook.

Joshua Gans

Fact Sheets

Global Antitrust (Competition)

The laws that set the ground rules prohibiting firms from engaging in anti-competitive practices are usually called “antitrust laws” in the United States, and “competition laws” in Europe and other regions. These laws differ among nations, and each country enforces its laws independently.

Quote

Yelp’s Six-Year Grudge Against Google

"Even if nothing else takes place, a consequence of this kind of intervention, so visible and so significant, has been to give other firms more room to maneuver." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University

William E. Kovacic
The New York Times
July 1, 2017

Featured Article

Innovation, Reallocation and Growth

The authors use a model to suggest which sorts of industrial subsidies encourage growth.

By: Daron Acemoglu, Nicholas Bloom, Ufuk Akcigit, William R. Kerr