Issues

Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Upcoming Events

16th Annual International Industrial Organization Conference

Hosted by Kelley School of Business at Indiana University

April 20, 2018, Indianapolis, IN

TAP Blog

Joshua Wright Presents an Antitrust Framework for Internet Governance

An article by George Mason University professor Joshua Wright explains the value of enabling the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to police internet service providers (ISPs).

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Quote

If You Love High TV Bills, This Is the Merger for You

"Any way you count it, the result is a grand and easily predictable reduction in effective competition. This is what most clearly justifies Justice’s opposition to the merger." — Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University

Tim Wu
New York Times
March 22, 2018

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz