Intellectual Property

Patents

A patent provides protection for an invention to the owner of the patent. The protection is granted for a limited period, generally 20 years. Patent protection means that the invention cannot be commercially made, used, distributed or sold without the patent owner's consent.

Featured Article

Trading and Enforcing Patent Rights

We study how the market for innovation affects enforcement of patent rights.

By: Alberto Galasso, Carlos J. Serrano, Mark Schankerman

Fact Sheets

Patent Reform

A patent is an exclusive legal right to own and market an invention or improvement for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of the invention.

TAP Blog

Do Patents Stifle Cumulative Innovation?

Professor Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, discusses a new paper by Bhaven Sampat and Heidi Williams that measures the impact of patents on follow-on innovations.

Joshua Gans

Quote

Alice Is Killing the Trolls -- But Expect Patent Lawyers to Strike Back

"We may be going back to the world of the 1980s; not only the patentable subject matter world but maybe also in claiming and means plus function claims." — Mark Lemley, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Mark Lemley
InfoWorld
September 18, 2014