Intellectual Property

Patents

A patent provides protection for an invention to the owner of the patent. The protection is granted for a limited period, generally 20 years. Patent protection means that the invention cannot be commercially made, used, distributed or sold without the patent owner's consent.

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Upcoming Events

IP Practitioners-in-Residence: Scott Allen & Ryan McDonnell

Presented by the Center for Intellectual Property Research

February 19, 2019, Bloomington, IN

TAP Blog

TAP Scholars Work on Intellectual Property Issues

In honor of World IP Day, TAP highlights a few of the articles and scholars that examine intellectual property technology-policy issues.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Software Patents

A patent provides an exclusive legal right to an invention for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of that innovation. As with other property rights, patents may be sold, transferred, or licensed for a third party’s use.

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Our Pick of the Decade’s Eight Best Young Economists

The Economist names MIT’s Heidi Williams among "the decade's eight best young economists." Professor Williams is lauded for her pursuit of a "more rigorous understanding of technological progress in medicine and health care."

Heidi Williams
The Economist
December 18, 2018

Featured Article

A Simple Approach to Setting Reasonable Royalties for Standard-Essential Patents

This article suggests binding arbitration as a way to resolve disputes arising within standard-setting organizations.

By: Mark Lemley, Carl Shapiro