Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Internet

Different business models have evolved for providing information on the Internet, including search engines, which make money from advertising; subscription web sites; and free web sites which drive off-line sales. Scholars examine the evolution of this marketplace and its implications for content providers and businesses.

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TAP Blog

In an op-ed article written for The Washington Post, Professors Woodrow Hartzog and Neil Richards explain why the current online privacy ecosystem in the U.S. is failing; and, they encourage policymakers to “redefine itself as the country that protects the trust that people give to companies.”
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2018.
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove outlines the findings from the New York Attorney General’s investigation into Oath’s violation of COPPA.
For the past couple of years, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman has been delving into all things emojis. This post rounds up all of his work on emojis and the law to date.
Professors Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University School of Law, and Daniel Solove, George Washington University, share their expertise with the FTC during the Hearings Initiative on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.
Several TAP scholars will be sharing their insights during next week’s FTC Hearing on whether changes in the economy, new technologies, or international developments warrant adjustments to the competition and consumer protection laws and policies.
Discussing contextual integrity as a framework to design, evaluate, and craft regulation for privacy was the focus of last month’s symposium hosted by Princeton’s Center for Information Technology and Cornell Tech’s Digital Life Initiative. Read the summary of the report.
Columbia law professor Tim Wu shares expertise from his time as a Senior Advisor with the Federal Trade Commission to explain how the agency approved Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram. Professor Wu proposes unwinding that merger in order to insert competition to help ‘check’ Facebook’s power.
Stanford economics professor Susan Athey explains why she believes the field of economics and machine learning is “on the verge of exploding.”
For a look at the current state of consumer data privacy, read up on recent works by TAP privacy experts. This post provides an overview of some recently published articles and blogs dealing with consumer data.
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Upcoming Events

State of the Net 2019

January 29, 2019, Washington, DC

2019 Internet Law Works-in-Progress

March 2, 2019, Santa Clara, CA

Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

Sharing Data for Deals? More Like Watching It Go With a Sigh

"There are so many aspects of how companies deal with the public that obfuscates what actually goes on and so many attempts to placate people using jargon. I’ve spoken to lawyers who write privacy policies who admit — they admit — that they aren’t written for the public." — Joseph Turow, Professor of Communications, University of Pennsylvania

Joseph Turow
The New York Times
December 24, 2018

Featured Article

Ideological Segregation Online and Offline

Measures the degree of ideological segregation in the market for online news and compares this to other news sources.

By: Jesse Shapiro, Matthew Gentzkow