Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Internet

Different business models have evolved for providing information on the Internet, including search engines, which make money from advertising; subscription web sites; and free web sites which drive off-line sales. Scholars examine the evolution of this marketplace and its implications for content providers and businesses.

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Quotes

Government Case Details Sneaky Facebook Behavior

This article reports on Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) efforts to regulate Facebook’s privacy weaknesses. William Kovacic, George Washington University law professor and former FTC Chairman, is quoted.
William E. Kovacic
Source: AP News
July 24, 2019

Justice Department Announces Broad Antitrust Review of Big Tech

"It looks like the antitrust winter is over." — Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University


Tim Wu
Source: The Washington Post
July 23, 2019

What Consumers Should Know About Equifax $700M Settlement

"You cannot determine with certainty that the information will never wind up in the hands of people who are going to use it." — Ryan Calo, Professor of Law, University of Washington


M. Ryan Calo
Source: NBC News
July 22, 2019

Top Research Websites, Search Engines, and a Research Choice Menu for K-12 Students

"Television didn’t transform education. Neither will the internet. But it will be another tool for teachers to use in their effort to reach students in the classroom." — John Palfrey, Head of School, Phillips Academy


John Palfrey
Source: Tech & Learning
July 17, 2019

FTC Reportedly Approves $5 Billion Settlement with Facebook

"This has emerged as a powerful test of the FTC's credibility as a privacy data protection authority. If it seems to conclude this in a way that is weak, it will suffer tremendously."  — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: CNN
July 12, 2019

Facebook’s Face-ID Database Could Be the Biggest in the World. Yes, It Should Worry Us.

"The payoff for Facebook is to have a bigger and broader sense of everybody’s preferences, both individually and collectively. That helps it not only target ads but target and develop services, too." — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia


Siva Vaidhyanathan
Source: Slate
July 9, 2019

Emojis Are Increasingly Coming Up in Court Cases. Judges Are Struggling with How to Interpret Them.

"With the proliferation of any new technology, there is an adjustment period for everyone, including judges. As judges become more familiar and comfortable with emojis, they will figure out the best ways to adapt existing legal principles to [them]." — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: CNN Business
July 8, 2019

Is ‘Big Tech’ Too Big? A Look at Growing Antitrust Scrutiny

The article reports on investigations at the U.S. Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission over “aggressive business practices” at Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple. Additionally, the report includes a look into the House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust probe. New York University antitrust law professor Eleanor Fox is quoted.


Eleanor Fox
Source: The Washington Post
June 4, 2019

Safe Space or Police State: How Far Should You Go in Monitoring Your Kids Online?

"I’m always nervous about any service provider that wants my password. That’s fundamentally insecure." — Lorrie Cranor, Professor of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: The Wall Street Journal
June 4, 2019

Deepfake Porn and the Ethics of Being Able to Watch Whatever Your Imagination Desires

"In the US, the legal options are small but potent if (big if) one has the funds to hire an attorney and one can find the creator. Defamation and intentional infliction of emotional distress are potential claims." — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Maryland


Danielle Citron
Source: Metro UK
May 31, 2019
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TAP Blog

Applications of Contextual Integrity – Report from the 2nd Symposium

Contextual integrity (CI) was first proposed by Helen Nissenbaum in 2004 as a new framework for reasoning about privacy. Discussing how CI can inform policy and system design, and how the theory can be refined, operationalized, and applied to emerging technologies was the focus of the 2nd Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity.

TAP Guest Blogger

Upcoming Events

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Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Featured Article

Internet Architecture and Innovation

This book analyzes the architecture of the internet, how it fosters innovation, and what that suggests for the future.

By: Barbara van Schewick