Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

Networks and Infrastructure

Although “the Internet” seems ethereal, it is in fact a network of networks that connects billions of users around the world. The capabilities of the Internet are dependent on the reach of those networks. Many governments worldwide are considering how to effectively and efficiently make robust networks available to their citizens to enable them to access the Internet.

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TAP Blog

Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, Boston University, argue that AI can be the basis of two types of technological progress: automation and enhancement; and they show that “there is scope for public policy to ensure that resources are allocated optimally between the two in order to ensure fulfillment of AI’s potential for growth, employment, and prosperity.”
Stanford’s Gregory Rosston provides his insights to the net neutrality debate in a policy brief he recently prepared for the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
NYU’s Stern School of Business economics professor Nicholas Economides explains that the FCC’s vote to repeal net neutrality will “usher in the era of paid prioritization.”
Net neutrality expert Barbara van Schewick shares her reaction to the FCC’s recent vote that repealed net neutrality rules.
An article by George Mason University professor Joshua Wright explains the value of enabling the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to police internet service providers (ISPs).
Professors Evan Selinger and Brett Frischmann examine the net neutrality debate from the perspective that we are all content providers and content users. They believe that management of the internet should be based on the “timing and quantity of traffic flows.”
Columbia law professor Tim Wu provides a history lesson to help put FCC Chairman Pai’s proposed changes to net neutrality into perspective.
Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick provides insights into the decades-long commitment that the FCC and its different Chairmen have undertaken to protect an open and accessible internet.
Harvard business professor Shane Greenstein explains the economic factors that produce network congestion.
Economics professor Nicholas Economides explains why the Federal Communications Commission’s recent decision regarding net neutrality will protect the free flow of content on the Internet and ensure fair competition.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Bad News for AT&T and Comcast: Calif. Senate Panel Oks Net Neutrality Bill

"Today, the Internet is a space where every Californian, no matter the color of their skin or the size of their wallets, has equal chance of reaching people online. It's a space where we the people—not AT&T and Comcast—determine what succeeds in our economy, our culture, and our democracy." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Barbara van Schewick
Ars Technica
April 18, 2018

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz