Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

TAP Blog

Lorrie Cranor Shares First-Person Account of Having Her Mobile Phone Hijacked by an ID Thief

Lorrie Cranor, the Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission, shares her experience about having her mobile phone account hijacked by an identity thief.

TAP Staff Blogger

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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Stanford Study: T-Mobile's Binge On Is 'Likely Illegal'

"T-Mobile’s Binge On is aptly named — it feels good in the short-term but harms consumers in the long run. The program limits user choice, distorts competition, stifles innovation, and harms free speech on the Internet. If more ISPs offer similar programs, these harms will only grow worse." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Barbara van Schewick
The Verge
January 29, 2016

Featured Article

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

This article analyzes the advantages of allowing public access to broadcast frequencies between commercial stations.

By: Kevin Werbach