Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz

Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

TAP Blog

The Challenges in Designing the FCC’s Broadcast Spectrum Incentive Auction

Professors Ilya Segal and Jonathan Levin, both with Stanford University, are two of the leading experts in auction theory and implementation chosen by the Federal Communications Commission to design the unprecedented broadcast spectrum incentive auction. Professors Segal and Levin graciously shared their expertise and time with TAP in order to explain the reverse and forward auctions, the components that they are directly involved with.

TAP Staff Blogger

Quote

Disruptions: Internet’s Sad Legacy: No More Secrets

“Just because information is unavailable to you and you don’t see it doesn’t mean that it is not being captured, stored, or even seen by someone else in transit.” — Ed Felten, Professor, Princeton University

Edward Felten
New York Times
December 15, 2013