Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

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TAP Blog

In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.
How did the U.S. Supreme Court arrive at its Carpenter decision? University of Chicago Law School professor Lior Strahilevitz offers his analysis of the Justices’ opinions.
Colorado law professor Margot Kaminski discusses the “paradigm-shifting implications” for Fourth Amendment and privacy law that come out of Chief Justice Robert’s opinion in the Carpenter decision.
Carpenter is incorrect,” says New York University law professor Richard Epstein. Professor Epstein explains why invoking the third-party doctrine was the wrong analysis for this case that uses cell-site location information to convict a thief.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove discusses the Carpenter decision, and he explains why he believes the ruling falls short of its potential to address the shortcomings of the third-party doctrine in the digital age.
Georgetown University law professor Paul Ohm explains why the U.S. Supreme Court Carpenter decision has “sweeping consequences for privacy and law enforcement.”
TAP scholars provide their insights on the U.S. Supreme Court Carpenter decision. This post introduces and links to several articles examining the court's decision.
University of Chicago law and economics professor Omri Ben-Shahar delves into the legal implications of Apple’s handling of its recent iOS software update.
University of Chicago law professor Omri Ben-Shahar breaks down privacy alarmists’ concerns with data-driven devices.
Lorrie Cranor, the Chief Technologist for the Federal Trade Commission, shares her experience about having her mobile phone account hijacked by an identity thief.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

Trump’s 5G Plan Is More Than a Gift to His Base

"Making capacity available in real time at market prices limits hoarding and encourages innovation. Unleashing our brilliant start-up ecosystem through such market mechanisms, along with opportunities for unlicensed access to wireless capacity, is America’s best hope to beat China in 5G." — Kevin Werbach, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics, University of Pennsylvania

Kevin Werbach
The New York Times
March 6, 2019

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz