Networks and Infrastructure

Wireless

Wireless networks allow users to access telecommunications and the Internet while on the move. The wireless devices operate on the electromagnetic spectrum, which is a finite resource. The allocation and assignment of spectrum, particularly given the burgeoning demand for wireless access to the Internet, poses a unique set of policy decisions for regulators worldwide.

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Quotes

Trump’s 5G Plan Is More Than a Gift to His Base

"Making capacity available in real time at market prices limits hoarding and encourages innovation. Unleashing our brilliant start-up ecosystem through such market mechanisms, along with opportunities for unlicensed access to wireless capacity, is America’s best hope to beat China in 5G." — Kevin Werbach, Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics, University of Pennsylvania


Kevin Werbach
Source: The New York Times
March 6, 2019

Why Tech Giants Will Love the Supreme Court's Ruling for Digital Privacy

"We’ve entered an age in which people are constantly sharing lots of information about themselves with Google or with AT&T or with their internet service provider. All of the sudden the fact that that information is being shared does not mean that the government can get that information without a search warrant." — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago


Lior Strahilevitz
Source: Yahoo Finance
June 22, 2018

Net Neutrality Is the Secret Sauce that Has Made the Internet Awesome

"Net neutrality protections are absolutely consistent with a free market framework. They are really a way to protect all these free markets that arose from and depend on the internet." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University


Barbara van Schewick
Source: Vox
December 14, 2017

Stanford Study: T-Mobile's Binge On Is 'Likely Illegal'

"T-Mobile’s Binge On is aptly named — it feels good in the short-term but harms consumers in the long run. The program limits user choice, distorts competition, stifles innovation, and harms free speech on the Internet. If more ISPs offer similar programs, these harms will only grow worse." — Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law, Stanford University


Barbara van Schewick
Source: The Verge
January 29, 2016

Why Apple Pay Can Succeed Where Google Wallet Failed

"Apple has a lot of experience in squeezing companies that thought they were the ones squeezing everyone else." — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, University of Maryland


James Grimmelmann
Source: Slate
September 12, 2014

With Apple Pay, the Tech Leader Takes Its Shot at Replacing the Wallet

"It won’t be too long before we look back on this era and think it’s nuts." — Jonathan Zittrain, Professor of Law, Harvard University


Jonathan Zittrain
Source: The Washington Post
September 9, 2014

Disruptions: Internet’s Sad Legacy: No More Secrets

“Just because information is unavailable to you and you don’t see it doesn’t mean that it is not being captured, stored, or even seen by someone else in transit.” — Ed Felten, Professor, Princeton University


Edward Felten
Source: New York Times
December 15, 2013

We’re Using a Ton of Mobile Data. With Google Glass, We’re About to Use a Whole Lot More.

“The iPhone was a game changer in terms of how much data people used. That caused two things: The carriers built out much more capacity . . . and they pushed people to pay for data. I think if Google Glass takes off, two similar things will happen.” — Gregory Rosston, Deputy Director, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research


Gregory L. Rosston
Source: The Washington Post
July 30, 2013

The Patent, Used as a Sword


James Bessen
Source: The New York Times
October 7, 2012
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TAP Blog

Trump’s 5G Plan Is More Than a Gift to His Base

In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.

Kevin Werbach

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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Featured Article

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

This article analyzes the advantages of allowing public access to broadcast frequencies between commercial stations.

By: Kevin Werbach