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Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

Professor Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology, and his colleague devised a semester-long program intended to challenge the biases and presumptions developers bring to their professional projects.
Take a look at the top viewed blog posts from this past year that have been written by TAP scholars.
Professor Ed Felten and his research colleagues at Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy identify issues with data breach notifications that make it possible for “scammers to create fake phishing emails, potentially victimizing users twice.”
Contextual integrity (CI) was first proposed by Helen Nissenbaum in 2004 as a new framework for reasoning about privacy. Discussing how CI can inform policy and system design, and how the theory can be refined, operationalized, and applied to emerging technologies was the focus of the 2nd Symposium on Applications of Contextual Integrity.
Chris Hoofnagle (University of California, Berkeley), Woodrow Hartzog (Northeastern University), and Daniel Solove (George Washington University) have joined forces to bring their expertise and insights to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) privacy regulatory efforts.
In an op-ed piece for The New York Times, Wharton School of Business professor Kevin Werbach shares his insights on why Facebook is entering the cryptocurrency business.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron explains how digital technology magnifies the harm from violations of sexual privacy in two new articles, “Sexual Privacy” and “Deep Fakes: A Looming Challenge for Privacy, Democracy, and National Security”.
Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove outlines why the U.S. does not currently have a comprehensive privacy law; and, he provides a practical path to establish federal oversight for privacy and security protections.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
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January 28, 2020, All countries

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March 14, 2020, New York, NY

Fact Sheets

Cloud Computing

“Cloud computing” describes how computer-related services and software increasingly have been provided over the Internet and other networks since the late 1990s.

Quote

F.E.C. Allows Security Company to Help 2020 Candidates Defend Campaigns

"The bad guys have had more time to spend on this, and more time to develop new tricks." — Ed Felten, Professor of Computer Science, Princeton University

Edward Felten
The New York Times
July 11, 2019

Featured Article

The Wasteland: Anticommons, White Spaces, and the Fallacy of Spectrum

This article analyzes the advantages of allowing public access to broadcast frequencies between commercial stations.

By: Kevin Werbach