Issues

Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

Professors Christopher Millard and Ian Walden share their expertise and enthusiasm for the complexities of cloud computing in an Internet-connected world.
Explore what the artificial intelligence and machine learning experts discussed during NYU’s event, AI Now.
Privacy law professor Woodrow Hartzog, Samford University’s Cumberland School of Law, states, “It’s time to abandon the misguided notion that public information is fair game.”
University of Chicago law professor Omri Ben-Shahar breaks down privacy alarmists’ concerns with data-driven devices.
In the NYT “Room for Debate,” Microsoft Principal Researcher danah boyd supports the development of “technology to help people be meaningfully connected in an augmented way.”
Georgetown University professor Paul Ohm and Georgia Tech professor Peter Swire provided this week’s Senate hearing with their thoughts on the FCC’s Proposed Rules for regulating Internet privacy.
At a U.S. Senate Hearing that will examine the FCC’s proposal for Internet service provider customer privacy, Georgia Tech privacy and cyberlaw scholar Peter Swire will share his knowledge about ISPs and privacy.
In an op-ed piece for The New York Times, Microsoft Principal Researcher Kate Crawford examines discrimination and bias inherent in the machine-learning algorithms that underlie the technology behind many “intelligent” systems.
Stanford economics professor Nicholas Bloom shares findings from a nine-month, controlled trial experiment within a large Chinese travel company that allowed select workers to telecommute.
University of Chicago law professor Omri Ben-Shahar examines the pros and cons of exchanging personal data for free services.
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Fact Sheets

Wireless and Mobile Communications

Wireless or “mobile” devices send information one-to-one (like mobile phones), one-to-many (like AM or FM radio), or many-to-many (like Wi-Fi Internet access). Wireless devices send and receive signals along the electromagnetic spectrum in the form of waves similar to visible light or sound.

Quote

F.E.C. Allows Security Company to Help 2020 Candidates Defend Campaigns

"The bad guys have had more time to spend on this, and more time to develop new tricks." — Ed Felten, Professor of Computer Science, Princeton University

Edward Felten
The New York Times
July 11, 2019

Featured Article

The Impact of Targeting Technology on Advertising Markets and Media Competition

This paper presents a formal analysis of advertising when the Internet allows targeting of advertisements.

By: Susan Athey, Joshua Gans