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Networks, the Internet, and Cloud Computing

This section contains research on the networks that make the Internet work, the evolution of different business models that operate on the Internet, and ways to store and access information on the Internet through Cloud Computing.

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TAP Blog

Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
In this opinion piece written for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania Legal Studies and Business Ethics professor Kevin Werbach explains why the wireless open access proposal from the Trump re-election campaign is worth considering.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein outlines the internet infrastructure trends from the recent past, and shows how they’ve evolved to support the modern digital economy.
Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
Matthew Gentzkow and his colleagues at Stanford and New York University report from their study on the way Facebook affects a range of individual and social welfare measures.
In honor of Data Privacy Day, TAP highlights some of the recent work from scholars who are thought-leaders with privacy technology-policy issues.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
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Upcoming Events

Data Privacy Day

January 28, 2020, All countries

Internet Law Works-in-Progress

March 14, 2020, New York, NY

Fact Sheets

Broadband Access and Infrastructure

High-speed Internet access – often referred to as “broadband” – is a set of technologies that, taken together, are recognized as a potential catalyst for global economic and social change.

Quote

F.E.C. Allows Security Company to Help 2020 Candidates Defend Campaigns

"The bad guys have had more time to spend on this, and more time to develop new tricks." — Ed Felten, Professor of Computer Science, Princeton University

Edward Felten
The New York Times
July 11, 2019

Featured Article

Higher Standards: Regulation in the Network Age

The author argues that the FCC should move towards a standards-based approach to overseeing digital networks.

By: Kevin Werbach