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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove outlines why the U.S. does not currently have a comprehensive privacy law; and, he provides a practical path to establish federal oversight for privacy and security protections.
University of Florida law professor Daniel Sokol and Stanford University Fellow Chirantan Chatterjee examine the risk of cybersecurity vulnerabilities within merger and acquisition activity.
A new paper by Santa Clara University’s Eric Goldman and Northeastern Law’s Jessica Silbey provides a roadmap to distinguish the legitimate and illegitimate bases for protecting privacy via copyright.
Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.
Harvard cyber and international law professor Jonathan Zittrain talks with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about privacy, autonomy, and information fiduciaries.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are hosting a symposium to discuss the full array of implications that “deep fakes” have on our society.
In honor of Data Privacy Day, TAP highlights some of the recent work from scholars who are thought-leaders with privacy technology-policy issues.
University of California, Berkeley professor Chris Hoofnagle looks beyond the platform-advertiser relationship at Facebook and Google, and examines the developer-platform incentives within these companies.
In an op-ed article written for The Washington Post, Professors Woodrow Hartzog and Neil Richards explain why the current online privacy ecosystem in the U.S. is failing; and, they encourage policymakers to “redefine itself as the country that protects the trust that people give to companies.”
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove provides his list of notable books on privacy and security from 2018.
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Upcoming Events

IAPP Canada Privacy Symposium 2019

May 23, 2019, Toronto, ON

2019 Annual Privacy Law Scholars Conference

May 30, 2019, Berkeley, CA

PrivacyCon 2019

June 27, 2019, Washington, DC

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

A Record FTC Fine Won't Fix Facebook, Privacy Experts Say

"A billion isn't what it used to be. The problem with Facebook writing a check is that it’s the cost of doing business and not a deterrent." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University

William E. Kovacic
Consumer Reports
April 25, 2019

Featured Article

Why the Right to Data Portability Likely Reduces Consumer Welfare: Antitrust and Privacy Critique

This article analyzes the potential weaknesses of the European Union’s potential new right to data portability.

By: Peter Swire, Yianni Lagos