Issues

Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

Back to main Privacy and Security page

TAP Blog

Professors Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University School of Law, and Daniel Solove, George Washington University, share their expertise with the FTC during the Hearings Initiative on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.
Andrea Matwyshyn, law and computer science professor at Northeastern University, presents concrete policy suggestions for charting a new course for cybersecurity in both the public and private sectors.
Several TAP scholars will be sharing their insights during next week’s FTC Hearing on whether changes in the economy, new technologies, or international developments warrant adjustments to the competition and consumer protection laws and policies.
A new article by Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire proposes a system for “categorizing and teaching the jumble of non-code yet vital cybersecurity topics.”
Discussing contextual integrity as a framework to design, evaluate, and craft regulation for privacy was the focus of last month’s symposium hosted by Princeton’s Center for Information Technology and Cornell Tech’s Digital Life Initiative. Read the summary of the report.
In the current digital economy, where consumers’ personal information is gathered, tracked, and used for corporate gain, Harvard professor Jonathan Zittrain and Yale professor Jack Balkin question how consumers can trust online services when there are no real guarantees that online platforms will not abuse that trust.
For a look at the current state of consumer data privacy, read up on recent works by TAP privacy experts. This post provides an overview of some recently published articles and blogs dealing with consumer data.
A new article by Danielle Citron and her co-author Robert Chesney provides the first comprehensive survey of the harms caused by “deep fake” technology, and examines the powerful incentives that deep fakes produce for privacy-destructive solutions.
In an opinion piece he wrote for The New York Times, University of Pennsylvania communications professor Joseph Turow explains why the term ‘privacy policy’ is misleading consumers.
Rotman School of Management economists Joshua Gans, Avi Goldfarb, and Ajay Agrawal discuss how regulatory policy and policies to mitigate potential negative consequences could impact the adoption of AI.
Results 21 - 30 of 382
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|

Upcoming Events

There are currently no upcoming events about Privacy and Security. Please see our events calendar for all upcoming events.

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Quote

Government Case Details Sneaky Facebook Behavior

This article reports on Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) efforts to regulate Facebook’s privacy weaknesses. William Kovacic, George Washington University law professor and former FTC Chairman, is quoted.
William E. Kovacic
AP News
July 24, 2019

Featured Article

Deep Fakes: A Looming Challenge for Privacy, Democracy, and National Security

"Deep fake" technology makes it possible to create audio and video files of real people saying and doing things they never said or did. These technologies create policy and legal problems. Possible responses include technological solutions, criminal and civil liability, and regulation.

By: Danielle Citron, Robert Chesney