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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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TAP Blog

Santa Clara University professor Eric Goldman offers a list of some of the identified errors and major ambiguities in the recently passed California Consumer Privacy Act. This post also provides additional resources for learning more about the bill.
How did the U.S. Supreme Court arrive at its Carpenter decision? University of Chicago Law School professor Lior Strahilevitz offers his analysis of the Justices’ opinions.
Colorado law professor Margot Kaminski discusses the “paradigm-shifting implications” for Fourth Amendment and privacy law that come out of Chief Justice Robert’s opinion in the Carpenter decision.
Carpenter is incorrect,” says New York University law professor Richard Epstein. Professor Epstein explains why invoking the third-party doctrine was the wrong analysis for this case that uses cell-site location information to convict a thief.
George Washington University privacy law professor Daniel Solove discusses the Carpenter decision, and he explains why he believes the ruling falls short of its potential to address the shortcomings of the third-party doctrine in the digital age.
Georgetown University law professor Paul Ohm explains why the U.S. Supreme Court Carpenter decision has “sweeping consequences for privacy and law enforcement.”
TAP scholars provide their insights on the U.S. Supreme Court Carpenter decision. This post introduces and links to several articles examining the court's decision.
Professors Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University, expose the dangers of facial recognition technology.
Professors Daniel Solove, George Washington University, and Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University, examine the recent U.S. Court of Appeals decision in LabMD's challenge to an FTC enforcement action.
Rotman School of Management economics professor Joshua Gans introduces his policy brief for The Hamilton Project: “Enhancing Competition with Data and Identity Portability.”
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Fact Sheets

Privacy and Consumers

There are a number of privacy issues related to how online companies collect, store, use and share personally identifiable information; and how consumers are informed about what is done with their information online.

Quote

Government Case Details Sneaky Facebook Behavior

This article reports on Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) efforts to regulate Facebook’s privacy weaknesses. William Kovacic, George Washington University law professor and former FTC Chairman, is quoted.
William E. Kovacic
AP News
July 24, 2019

Featured Article

Robots and Privacy

As robots become more mainstream, the technology can implicate privacy in obvious and surprising ways.

By: M. Ryan Calo