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Privacy and Security

Information technology lets people learn about one another on a scale previously unimaginable. Information in the wrong hands can be harmful. Scholars on this site consider problems of privacy, fraud, identity, and security posed by the digital age.

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Quotes

Facebook Is Laughing All the Way to the Bank as Americans Shrug Off Privacy Concerns

This article explores privacy issues inherent in social media platforms, specifically Facebook; and examines legislative and corporate efforts to balance securing users’ personal data with the business of big data. Law professors Fred Cate, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, Lior Strahilevitz, University of Chicago Law School, and Joel Reidenberg, Fordham University, are quoted.


Fred Cate
Source: Los Angeles Times
February 4, 2019

You've Been Breached: Hackers Stole Nearly Half a Billion Personal Records in 2018

"We've always been sloppy when it comes to data security and the hackers are finding creative new ways to exploit that. We are definitely seeing attacks that focus on the human element, both at the individual level — new forms of phishing attacks — but also at the enterprise level — humans making mistakes that allow for a large-scale breach." — Lorrie Faith Cranor, Privacy and Cybersecurity expert, Carnegie Mellon University


Lorrie Faith Cranor
Source: NBC News
February 4, 2019

California Could Soon Have Its Own Version of the Internet

"I think that California, like Brussels, certainly might set the bar for compliance on several important tech issues. But this might not lead to balkanization in the way we’re seeing in China and Russia." — Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law, Northeastern University


Woodrow Hartzog
Source: Wired
December 29, 2018

Sharing Data for Deals? More Like Watching It Go With a Sigh

"There are so many aspects of how companies deal with the public that obfuscates what actually goes on and so many attempts to placate people using jargon. I’ve spoken to lawyers who write privacy policies who admit — they admit — that they aren’t written for the public." — Joseph Turow, Professor of Communications, University of Pennsylvania


Joseph Turow
Source: The New York Times
December 24, 2018

It’s Time to Try Something Different on Internet Privacy

"It’s time to take a bold step forward. The United States has an opportunity to redefine itself as the country that protects the trust that people give to companies. By embracing trust, the United States can become a leader on privacy instead of following the path of false promises and diminishing returns." — Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law, Northeastern University and Neil Richards, Professor of Law, Washington University in St. Louis


Woodrow Hartzog
Source: The Washington Post
December 20, 2018

Violating Our Privacy Is in Facebook's DNA

"These two principles – that Facebook is benevolent and that privacy is quaint and inefficient – drive everything Facebook does. They go a long way to explain why Facebook continued to give precious user data to a set of “trusted” partners years after the company claimed it had ended such a program." — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia


Siva Vaidhyanathan
Source: The Guardian
December 20, 2018

Facial Recognition Has to Be Regulated to Protect the Public, Says AI Report

"It’s time to regulate facial recognition and affect recognition. Claiming to ‘see’ into people’s interior states is neither scientific nor ethical." — Kate Crawford, Distinguished Research Professor, New York University


Kate Crawford
Source: MIT’s Technology Review
December 6, 2018

You Thought Fake News Was Bad? Deep Fakes Are Where Truth Goes to Die

"I’m starting to see how a well-timed deep fake could very well disrupt the democratic process." — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Maryland


Danielle Citron
Source: The Guardian
November 12, 2018

Facebook’s Failure to End ‘Public by Default’

"Right now, users have little choice in the public exposure of their profile pictures. Every single one of them is set to “public” by default. Even if you try to limit your current profile picture visibility using Facebook’s privacy settings for the individual photo, it will still be public." — Woodrow Hartzog, Professor of Law, Northeastern University and Evan Selinger, Professor of Philosophy, Rochester Institute of Technology


Evan Selinger
Source: Medium
November 7, 2018

Online Hate Is Spreading, and Internet Platforms Can’t Stop It

"We need to be really vigilant about speech that gets really close to reducing people to non-humans and calling for their destruction. Even in vague ways, I think that is harmful and dangerous and troubling. It doesn’t mean it has to be removed. We just have to follow it." — Danielle Citron, Professor of Law, University of Maryland


Danielle Citron
Source: Boston Globe
November 1, 2018
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TAP Blog

Top Internet Law Developments of 2018

Though 2019 is well underway, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman’s recap of 2018’s Internet law issues provides a valuable perspective on the ongoing internet challenges for regulators, policymakers, and technology businesses.

Eric Goldman

Fact Sheets

Social Networking

Social networking websites are places on the Internet where people can connect with those who share their interests. Additionally, they can function as economic “platforms” that serve different groups of many users, including consumers, advertisers, game developers, and others. 

Featured Article

Lost in the Cloud

This op-ed raises concerns about storing personal files on the Internet.

By: Jonathan Zittrain