TAP Blog

Professor Omer Tene, IAPP Senior Fellow, examines the hiQ Labs vs. LinkedIn Corporation decision to highlight the deep divide around the notion of privacy and data protection between Europe and the U.S. This decision also shows the sharp lines between privacy and competition policy, particularly in the context of major tech platforms and the data ecosystems they nurture.
Economics professors Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, BU, explain why the US and many industrialized countries are seeing rising wage inequality go hand in hand with modest productivity gains.
In their article, “From Trade Secrecy to Seclusion,” UC Berkeley law professor Sonia Katyal and UC Hastings adjunct law professor Charles Graves argue that trade secret law is being applied beyond its intended purpose of protecting intellectual property and increasingly being used as a tool for open-ended concealment.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom is widely known for his research on remote work and best management practices. This post focuses on how the work-from-home transformation triggered by the pandemic is impacting city centers and suburbs.
Harvard’s Josh Lerner and Stanford’s Amit Seru share findings from their recent work with Nick Short and Yuan Sun to identify who the innovators and patent awardees are within the financial technology sector.
Harvard Business School’s Josh Lerner examines the underlying causes of the asset management industry’s low levels of minority ownership in the U.S. He shares findings from a new working paper cowritten with Johan Cassel and Emmanuel Yimfor.
TAP scholar Urs Gasser and colleagues at the Berkman Klein Center examine the potential promise and risks that extended reality (XR) technologies hold for youth and identify issues for stakeholders to consider.
Stanford professor Erik Brynjolfsson discusses the strengths of AI technology, the challenges of measuring the economic impact of the digital economy, and how digitally resilient companies were in a better position to thrive through the pandemic than others
George Washington University Law Professor and former Chair of the FTC, William Kovacic outlines the transformation happening in American antitrust policy.
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove interviews Washington University law professor Neil Richards about his book, "Why Privacy Matters".
UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.
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