TAP Blog

Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom has studied working-from-home (WFH) and its impact on employees, firms, and societies for many years. In this article, he presents new results from a US survey on WFH during the coronavirus pandemic.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove shares his insights from reviewing the ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and he discusses possible options –post Schrems II-- to transfer personal data from the EU to the U.S.
Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire reviews the Schrems II ruling and discusses some of the challenges with reconciling fundamental rights and national security.
This is the second of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the constitutional implications created by the Schrems II judgment not only for the EU but also for greater Europe.
This is the first of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the uncertainties created by the Schrems II judgment for the future of international data transfers.
MIT economics professor Daron Acemoglu discusses the policies in place that support companies’ choices to increase automation, and he outlines a course of action for policy reforms and technology development that could benefit workers of all skills and backgrounds.
Following the “Schrems II” decision, with the invalidation of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield, privacy expert Omer Tene explains why data will continue to flow across borders, including from Europe to the U.S.
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, provides a narrated and selective bibliography on Section 230.
Mary L. Gray, faculty associate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society and a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, calls out the tech sector for exacerbating “the systemic racism and health disparities that have given the pandemic its grotesque shape in our country — because they ignore them.”
University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo discusses what steps social media companies and the government can legally take to stop the spread of misinformation, while also ensuring that everyone has the right to express their opinion.
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