TAP Blog

Economists Susan Athey, Stanford, and Daron Acemoglu, MIT, will be testifying at today’s House Budget Committee hearing on artificial intelligence and the workforce.
This guest post emphasizes that while emerging technologies such as natural language processing and machine learning promise to make public sector services more efficient, they also pose ethical challenges in implementation.
In their recent paper, “A Duty of Loyalty for Privacy Law,” Professors Neil Richards and Woodrow Hartzog propose imposing a duty of loyalty on companies that collect and process human information.
Carnegie Mellon University computer science and privacy expert Lorrie Cranor and her colleague Hana Habib, Graduate Research Assistant with CMU, explain what the private-browsing tools available with most browsers actually provide users. They clarify: “don’t confuse privacy for anonymity.”
In “The Allocation of Decision Authority to Human and Artificial Intelligence” economists Susan Athey, Kevin Bryan, and Joshua Gans share an analysis of how humans and artificial intelligence could work effectively together in the decision-making process.
A selection of articles recently written by TAP scholars explore AI and business competition, autonomous vehicles, how privacy regulation could support innovation, privacy interfaces focused on peoples’ needs, and licensing standard-essential patents for 5G telecommunications.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom has studied working-from-home (WFH) and its impact on employees, firms, and societies for many years. In this article, he presents new results from a US survey on WFH during the coronavirus pandemic.
George Washington University privacy law expert Daniel Solove shares his insights from reviewing the ‘Schrems II’ ruling, and he discusses possible options –post Schrems II-- to transfer personal data from the EU to the U.S.
Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire reviews the Schrems II ruling and discusses some of the challenges with reconciling fundamental rights and national security.
This is the second of a two-part post from TAP guest blogger, Professor Theodore Christakis, University Grenoble Alpes. Professor Christakis discusses the constitutional implications created by the Schrems II judgment not only for the EU but also for greater Europe.
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