TAP Blog

Stanford law professor Barbara van Schewick explains why AT&T’s decision to suspend its sponsored data program is a “win for an open and free internet.”
In their new article, “Privacy Harms,” privacy experts and law professors Danielle Citron, University of Virginia, and Daniel Solove, George Washington University, discuss the legal challenges in holding privacy violators accountable for the harms they cause.
The Case for Patents, a new book by Northwestern University business and law professor Daniel Spulber, emphasizes the importance of incentives for invention, innovation, and technology adoption.
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business of NYU, and Professor Ioannis Lianos, University College of London Faculty of Laws, explain how digital platforms have caused a market failure.
Professor Bennett Capers discusses his article, “Afrofuturism, Critical Race Theory, and Policing in the Year 2044,” and shares how his interests in literature, experience as a prosecutor, and his personal identity influence his scholarship.
Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, explains why he believes Section 230 “…should be restored to its original meaning and purpose – a much more limited scope than it has now.” He discusses how recovering distributor liability would promote greater responsibility for platforms and ISPs.
Professor William Kerr, Harvard Business School, shares data on immigrant contributions, examines the important roles played by universities and firms, and provides suggestions for how the U.S. immigration policy could be improved.
Harvard professor Jonathan Zittrain shares several years of thinking around digital governance during his talk at the 2020 Tanner Lecture on Human Values. His two-part lecture, titled “Gaining Power, Losing Control,” reflects on how technology has empowered humanity, and yet in many ways, we have less and less control.
International privacy expert and GWU law professor Daniel Solove reaches out to children with his new book, The Eyemonger.
Matthew Gentzkow, Stanford economist, discusses a recent paper that explores to what extent rising affective polarization has seen increases in the U.S. and other developed democracies.
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