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Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perceive, learn and reason in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities. TAP scholars consider AI’s effects on labor, business, policing, law, medicine, war, free speech, privacy and democracy, and discuss potential solutions to mitigate harms.

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Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are hosting a symposium to discuss the full array of implications that “deep fakes” have on our society.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, Boston University, argue that AI can be the basis of two types of technological progress: automation and enhancement; and they show that “there is scope for public policy to ensure that resources are allocated optimally between the two in order to ensure fulfillment of AI’s potential for growth, employment, and prosperity.”
A report from Cornell Tech’s Speed Conference shares research in areas of autonomous vehicles, warfare, information security, labor and manufacturing, content moderation, and finance.
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Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

AI Decoded: France’s Risky Dance with Surveillance

“There is no facial recognition component in the current bill. A devil’s advocate could say once it is adopted, things could change.” — Théodore Christakis, Professor of Law, Université Grenoble Alpes
Theodore Christakis
Politico
December 2, 2020

Featured Article

The Wrong Cognitive Measuring Stick

Attempting to compare human intelligence to machine intelligence is often incoherent. Human intelligence is not well understood, and human behavior is often irrational.

By: Braden Allenby