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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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TAP Academics

TAP Blog

New Article by Nicholas Economides and Ioannis Lianos Offers an Antitrust Perspective to Online Data Collection

Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business at NYU, and his co-author Ioannis Lianos, University College London and Hellenic Competition Commission, examine the collection of personal information from online platforms, such as Google and Facebook, from an antitrust perspective.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Quote

Big Tech’s ‘Buy and Kill’ Tactics Come Under Scrutiny

In this Financial Times article, Stanford Professor of Law Mark Lemley weighs in on the FTC's request to the five largest U.S. technology companies to provide information about prior acquisitions.
Mark Lemley
Financial Times
February 13, 2020

Featured Article

Using Spectrum Auctions to Enhance Competition in Wireless Services

This paper looks at how regulators can support more competition between different wireless services.

By: Gregory L. Rosston, Peter Cramton, Evan Kwerel, Andrzej (Andy) Skrzypacz