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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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TAP Academics

TAP Blog

Carl Shapiro Critiques the FTC’s Withdrawal of 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines

UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Global Antitrust (Competition)

The laws that set the ground rules prohibiting firms from engaging in anti-competitive practices are usually called “antitrust laws” in the United States, and “competition laws” in Europe and other regions. These laws differ among nations, and each country enforces its laws independently.

Quote

For big tech regulation, one-size-fits-all won't work

“You can worry about YouTube, Twitter, any social media platform with content moderation, but that's completely different than what's going on with Amazon and Google. If you lump them together, you're going to get the wrong solution because it's different problems.” — Carl Shapiro, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley

Carl Shapiro
TechTarget
October 29, 2021

Featured Article

Innovation, Reallocation and Growth

The authors use a model to suggest which sorts of industrial subsidies encourage growth.

By: Daron Acemoglu, Nicholas Bloom, Ufuk Akcigit, William R. Kerr