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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Research Articles

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TAP Blog

Carl Shapiro Critiques the FTC’s Withdrawal of 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines

UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Quote

For big tech regulation, one-size-fits-all won't work

“You can worry about YouTube, Twitter, any social media platform with content moderation, but that's completely different than what's going on with Amazon and Google. If you lump them together, you're going to get the wrong solution because it's different problems.” — Carl Shapiro, Professor of Economics, University of California, Berkeley

Carl Shapiro
TechTarget
October 29, 2021