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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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TAP Blog

George Washington University Law Professor and former Chair of the FTC, William Kovacic outlines the transformation happening in American antitrust policy.
UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.
Introduction to recent books by TAP scholars that examine issues about privacy, AI, patents, antitrust, national security, and cloud computing.
University of Chicago Law School professor Randy Picker discusses the key insights from four platform antitrust bills that were recently introduced to the House for consideration.
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business of NYU, and Professor Ioannis Lianos, University College of London Faculty of Laws, explain how digital platforms have caused a market failure.
A selection of articles recently written by TAP scholars explore AI and the impact on privacy, how to safeguard privacy and security in an interconnected world, digital platforms and antitrust, and patent reform to support innovation.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable digital technology events and people from 2020.
A new report by Georgia Tech Professor Peter Swire provides a framework for assessing issues of data portability.
A selection of articles recently written by TAP scholars explore AI and business competition, autonomous vehicles, how privacy regulation could support innovation, privacy interfaces focused on peoples’ needs, and licensing standard-essential patents for 5G telecommunications.
Professor Nicholas Economides, Stern School of Business at NYU, and his co-author Ioannis Lianos, University College London and Hellenic Competition Commission, examine the collection of personal information from online platforms, such as Google and Facebook, from an antitrust perspective.
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Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Quote

E.U. Takes Aim at Big Tech’s Power with Landmark Digital Act

“It is possible that even the U.S. Congress will now conclude that they are done watching from the sidelines when the E.U. regulates U.S. tech companies and will move from talking about legislative reform to actually legislating.” — Anu Bradford, Professor of Law, Columbia University

Anu Bradford
The New York Times
March 24, 2022

Featured Article

Understanding Online Markets and Antitrust Analysis

This paper considers the application of traditional antitrust analysis to online markets. This paper identifies several ways in which online markets differ from regular markets. Most online markets are multi-sided, and entry barriers are low.

By: Daniel Sokol, Jingyuan Ma