Issues

Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Fact Sheets

Global Antitrust (Competition)

The laws that set the ground rules prohibiting firms from engaging in anti-competitive practices are usually called “antitrust laws” in the United States, and “competition laws” in Europe and other regions. These laws differ among nations, and each country enforces its laws independently.

Government Procurement

“Procurement” is the process by which governments choose to obtain and buy goods and services from the private sector.

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

TAP Blog

Randy Picker Explains How Recent Antitrust Bills “Could Change Big Tech as We Know It”

University of Chicago Law School professor Randy Picker discusses the key insights from four platform antitrust bills that were recently introduced to the House for consideration.

TAP Staff Blogger

Quote

The Supreme Court’s NCAA Ruling Has Huge Implications Outside of Sports

"The significance of the ruling goes far beyond the unique setting of college sports. The decision hints at a revival of antitrust law and its application to an area of the economy antitrust law has unjustly neglected — the labor market." — Eric Posner, Professor of Law, University of Chicago

 

Eric Posner
The Washington Post
June 22, 2021

Featured Article

AT&T Shellacs the Government in Time Warner Merger Case

In June of 2018, United States District Court Judge Richard Leon ruled that government failed to provide enough evidence to enjoin the merger of AT&T with Time Warner.

By: Randal Picker