Issues

Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Fact Sheets

Global Antitrust (Competition)

The laws that set the ground rules prohibiting firms from engaging in anti-competitive practices are usually called “antitrust laws” in the United States, and “competition laws” in Europe and other regions. These laws differ among nations, and each country enforces its laws independently.

Government Procurement

“Procurement” is the process by which governments choose to obtain and buy goods and services from the private sector.

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

TAP Blog

Peter Swire Provides a Framework for Assessing Issues of Data Portability

A new report by Georgia Tech Professor Peter Swire provides a framework for assessing issues of data portability.

TAP Staff Blogger

Quote

This Deal Helped Turn Google Into an Ad Powerhouse. Is That a Problem?

“If I knew in 2007 what I know now, I would have voted to challenge the DoubleClick acquisition,” — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University
William E. Kovacic
The New York Times
September 21, 2020

Featured Article

Competing in the Age of AI

Artificial Intelligence (AI) enables the rapid growth of a new type of firm. Many traditional firms now compete directly with AI-based firms. Business strategies and competitive processes are changing.

By: Marco Iansiti, Karim R. Lakhani