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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Quotes

'The Wrath Of Mark': 4 Takeaways From The Government's Case Against Facebook

"Even to a jaded reader of antitrust-like documents over time, [this] opens your eyes and causes your jaw to drop." — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: National Public Radio
December 11, 2020

Facebook Lawsuits Don't Show Much Consumer Harm, But Must They?

"The Facebook lawsuits can be hard to prove because you have to persuade the court that the inference of that kind of harm is strong based on the conduct." — Andrew Gavil, Professor of Law, Howard University


Andy Gavil
Source: Reuters
December 10, 2020

DOJ Antitrust Fever Led to Google Lawsuit—Now Can They Win It?

"The DOJ has pulled together a narrow suit that they may have a chance of winning. But it’s not going to satisfy the people who say break up big tech.” — Eleanor Fox, Professor of Law, New York University

 


Eleanor Fox
Source: Forbes
November 23, 2020

Government kept to the sidelines as Google got big. Now regulators have the chance to rein the company back in.

“U. S. antitrust law gives a huge amount of freedom to firms to decide what competitive strategies they want,”  — Eleanor Fox, Professor of Law, New York University


Eleanor Fox
Source: The Washington Post
October 12, 2020

Government kept to the sidelines as Google got big. Now regulators have the chance to rein the company back in.

“There have been so many visible expressions of intent to bring a case, to do something, that they [U.S. Justice Department] cannot retreat from that if they are to retain any vestige of credibility,” — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: The Washington Post
October 12, 2020

'Near-perfect market intelligence': Why a House report says Big Tech monopolies are uniquely powerful

"If Congress does flip, you could end up with some kind of new scheme for the big digital marketplaces. It'd be like the Radio Act of 1927, a different paradigm for thinking of online platforms." — Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University


Tim Wu
Source: CNN
October 10, 2020

This Deal Helped Turn Google Into an Ad Powerhouse. Is That a Problem?

“If I knew in 2007 what I know now, I would have voted to challenge the DoubleClick acquisition,” — William Kovacic, Professor of Law, George Washington University
William E. Kovacic
Source: The New York Times
September 21, 2020

When Regulators Fail to Rein in Big Tech, Some Turn to Antitrust Litigation

Unlike cases brought by government agencies, which presumably seek to address consumer harm, judges sometimes view private plaintiffs as whining about their inability to compete. — Eleanor Fox, Professor of Antitrust Law, New York University
Eleanor Fox
Source: The Washington Post
August 21, 2020

Apple's 'Extreme' App Policies Give Google Defense in Fortnite Antitrust Suit

“Having other options definitely makes it a bit harder to say something is anticompetitive,” Economides said, speaking generally about app stores.“ With Apple, things are extreme because there’s no alternative whatsoever. That makes for a stronger potential case.” — Nicholas Economides, Professor of Economics, New York University
Nicholas Economides
Source: Reuters
August 17, 2020

Appeals Court Ruling for Qualcomm “A Victory of Theory Over Facts”

“I would describe it as a victory of theory over facts.” — Tim Wu, Professor of Law, Columbia University
Tim Wu
Source: Ars Technica
August 14, 2020
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TAP Blog

Carl Shapiro Critiques the FTC’s Withdrawal of 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines

UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Featured Article

Privacy’s Constitutional Moment and the Limits of Data Protection

The United States Congress must decide whether to enact a national privacy law like Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). But GDPR-style rules fail to protect against many harms of data overuse.

By: Neil Richards, Woodrow Hartzog