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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Quotes

Google Pushed Hard Behind the Scenes to Convince Regulators

"Google had the Microsoft case as a template. Google just had to convince the regulators it was sufficiently different from Microsoft." — Kevin Werbach, Associate Professor, University of Pennsylvania


Kevin Werbach
Source: The New York Times
January 2, 2013

FTC: Google Did Not Break Antitrust Law with Search Practices

"It has been the single issue that the antitrust system has had trouble dealing with since 1890. That’s because the consumer impacts typically are mixed." — William Kovacic, Professor, George Washington University


William E. Kovacic
Source: The Washington Post
January 2, 2013

Why The Antitrust Allegations Against Google Are Absurd

This article examines antitrust allegations against Google and its dominant position in Internet search. Professor Nicholas Economides, an antitrust expert at New York University’s Stern School of Business is quoted.


Nicholas Economides
Source: Forbes
April 26, 2012

Why The Antitrust Allegations Against Google Are Absurd

This article examines antitrust allegations against Google and its dominant position in Internet search. Professor Christopher Yoo, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, is quoted.


Christopher Yoo
Source: Forbes
April 26, 2012

Music Deals Could Transform Digital Market

This article examines the Federal Trade Commission’s review of two mergers that critics say could hamper the growth of the new digital-music platforms. Universal Music Group is seeking approval to buy EMI’s record label, while an investment group led by Sony is pursuing the green light to purchase EMI’s music-publishing business. Andy Gavil, Howard University professor of antitrust law, complex litigation, and federal regulation, is quoted.


Andy Gavil
Source: National Journal
April 22, 2012

Apple Not Likely to Be a Loser in the E-Book Legal Fight

"I think this is a strong case. The way U.S. antitrust law is written, in a conspiracy case it does not have to show adverse effects on consumers." — Nicholas Economides, Professor of Economics, New York University


Nicholas Economides
Source: The New York Times
April 11, 2012

Apple Not Likely to Be a Loser in the E-Book Legal Fight

"Apple has a history of being fairly aggressive in litigation. There’s some sense in their corporate culture that we’re right." — Mark Lemley, Professor of Law, Stanford University


Mark Lemley
Source: The New York Times
April 11, 2012

Justice Department to Sue E-book Publishers, Apple


Joshua Gans
Source: American Public Media’s Marketplace
March 9, 2012
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TAP Blog

William Kovacic on the United States’ Antitrust Transformation

George Washington University Law Professor and former Chair of the FTC, William Kovacic outlines the transformation happening in American antitrust policy.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Featured Article

Antitrust Policy Toward Patent Licensing: Why Negotiation Matters

Some are concerned that patents for complex innovations give rise to problems such as royalty stacking or patent thickets. However, empirical data shows that patent pools and negotiation of patent licenses tend to eliminate these concerns.

By: Daniel Spulber