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Competition Policy and Antitrust

Competition policy uses economic analysis to enhance our understanding of how firm behavior affects social welfare. Scholars featured on this site consider how technology markets function, and the special issues raised by networks, platforms, interoperability, and bundling by firms like Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

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Upcoming Events

Executive Education course: What’s new on competition in digital markets?

Hosted by the Toulouse School of Economics

June 10, 2022,  

TAP Blog

William Kovacic on the United States’ Antitrust Transformation

George Washington University Law Professor and former Chair of the FTC, William Kovacic outlines the transformation happening in American antitrust policy.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Comparative Antitrust

In the United States, “antitrust law” refers to the body of State and Federal laws that prohibits unlawful agreements and practices by firms with market power that harm competition. Europe, Asia and Latin America call the governance of market competition “competition law”.

Quote

E.U. Takes Aim at Big Tech’s Power with Landmark Digital Act

“It is possible that even the U.S. Congress will now conclude that they are done watching from the sidelines when the E.U. regulates U.S. tech companies and will move from talking about legislative reform to actually legislating.” — Anu Bradford, Professor of Law, Columbia University

Anu Bradford
The New York Times
March 24, 2022

Featured Article

Root and Branch Reconstruction: The Modern Transformation of U.S. Antitrust Law and Policy?

Advocates for the transformation of antitrust policy in the United States support the revival of egalitarian goals for enforcers. Reformers have gained in influence, but several factors will limit their impact.

By: William E. Kovacic