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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow shares findings from recent research that explores how polarization has evolved during the coronavirus pandemic.
Brooklyn Law professor Frank Pasquale’s new book, New Laws of Robotics: Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI, explores the ways that technological advances affect how we work, what media we consume, and how law is made and enforced; and he addresses the problems that arise when robots advance into hospitals, schools, and the military.
In their article, “How to Win with Machine Learning,” Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb explain how companies entering industries with an AI-enabled product or service can build a sustainable competitive advantage and raise entry barriers against latecomers.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, widely known for his research on remote work, shares his expertise about the ups and downs of working from home.
Erik Brynjolfsson and colleagues share findings from a study that looked at the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on remote work.
Professors Geoffrey Parker, Dartmouth College, and Marshall Van Alstyne, Boston University, share insights into why some platform-based businesses have been able to pivot and thrive amidst the COVID-19 restrictions while others flounder.
Economists Susan Athey, Stanford, and Daron Acemoglu, MIT, will be testifying at today’s House Budget Committee hearing on artificial intelligence and the workforce.
This guest post emphasizes that while emerging technologies such as natural language processing and machine learning promise to make public sector services more efficient, they also pose ethical challenges in implementation.
In “The Allocation of Decision Authority to Human and Artificial Intelligence” economists Susan Athey, Kevin Bryan, and Joshua Gans share an analysis of how humans and artificial intelligence could work effectively together in the decision-making process.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom has studied working-from-home (WFH) and its impact on employees, firms, and societies for many years. In this article, he presents new results from a US survey on WFH during the coronavirus pandemic.
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Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

Leading In 2021: 5 Key Business Trends And 15 Companies To Watch

Nicholas Bloom, a remote work expert at Stanford, supports the hybrid approach, recommending that leaders let employees work from home one to three days a week once the pandemic ends. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

Nicholas Bloom
Forbes
December 21, 2020

Featured Article

Rendering Sensible Salient 

Technological changes threaten democracy, producing polarization and fragmentation. Deliberative conventions of ordinary citizens could help restore a common understanding of issues.

By: Lawrence Lessig