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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Microsoft Partner Researcher danah boyd shared insights from her multi-year ethnographic study of the U.S. census. She discussed how the U.S. Census Bureau’s decision to embrace differential privacy as part of its system to protect statistical confidentiality upended what people imagined the work of data to be.
In “The Inequalities of Innovation,” Santa Clara University law professor Colleen Chien examines the relationship between inequality, innovation, and patents.
Stanford economics professor Nicholas Bloom joins Prof Nirvikar Singh, University of California, Santa Cruz, to discuss the future of work on the “Ideas for India” podcast. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, remote work has become the norm for many organizations. This has raised questions about worker productivity and equity, work-life balance, and the future of commuting and cities.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom shares takeaways from his research over the past two and a half years on remote and hybrid work.
Dr. Kate Crawford, Research Professor at USC Annenberg, weighs in on the debate about the possibility of AI systems becoming sentient in the near future. She emphasizes that of more concern are “the types of biases or stereotypes that are very commonly built into these models.”
In a recent paper, Professors Daniel Spulber, Northwestern University, and Pere Arque´-Castells, University of Groningen, show that some of the external benefits of R&D are transmitted through markets for technology.
In this third of six reports from the Mapping the Use of Facial Recognition in Public Spaces in Europe (MAPFRE) project, Professor Theodore Christakis, Université Grenoble Alpes, and his colleagues provide the first ever detailed analysis of what is the most widespread way in which facial recognition is used in public and private spaces: to authorize access to a place or to a service.
In the second of six reports from the Mapping the Use of Facial Recognition in Public Spaces in Europe (MAPFRE) project, Professor Theodore Christakis, Université Grenoble Alpes, and his colleagues present a classification table that shows the different facial processing functionalities used in public spaces.
This is the first of six reports from the Mapping the Use of Facial Recognition in Public Spaces in Europe (MAPFRE) project. International law scholar, Professor Theodore Christakis, Université Grenoble Alpes, is the project leader.
Economics professors Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, BU, explain why the US and many industrialized countries are seeing rising wage inequality go hand in hand with modest productivity gains.
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Fact Sheets

Health Information Technology

“Health Information Technology” or Health IT encompasses a wide range of hardware and software products used by patients, doctors, pharmacies, hospitals, insurers or other participants in the healthcare ecosystem to process and store data and communications related to health care.

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What We Know Now About the Business Impact of Hybrid Work

“But the biggest challenge—and maybe the one unexpected bit—is how much employees have got comfortable with choice of days in the office and like to flip that around each week, for whatever reason, childcare reasons, work, personal reasons, etc. ” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

Nicholas Bloom
Time
September 6, 2022

Featured Article

How Computer Automation Affects Occupations: Technology, Jobs, and Skills

Does computer automation lead to job losses? Data from the United States show that jobs that use computers intensively have experienced more growth in past decades; jobs that use few computers have had more losses.

By: James Bessen