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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Economics professors Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, BU, explain why the US and many industrialized countries are seeing rising wage inequality go hand in hand with modest productivity gains.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom is widely known for his research on remote work and best management practices. This post focuses on how the work-from-home transformation triggered by the pandemic is impacting city centers and suburbs.
Harvard’s Josh Lerner and Stanford’s Amit Seru share findings from their recent work with Nick Short and Yuan Sun to identify who the innovators and patent awardees are within the financial technology sector.
Harvard Business School’s Josh Lerner examines the underlying causes of the asset management industry’s low levels of minority ownership in the U.S. He shares findings from a new working paper cowritten with Johan Cassel and Emmanuel Yimfor.
Stanford professor Erik Brynjolfsson discusses the strengths of AI technology, the challenges of measuring the economic impact of the digital economy, and how digitally resilient companies were in a better position to thrive through the pandemic than others
UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom examines the pandemic-triggered migration away from large city centers (the donut effect) and the long-term challenges for city policymakers.
Matthew Gentzkow, Stanford economist, discusses a recent paper that explores to what extent rising affective polarization has seen increases in the U.S. and other developed democracies.
Can we observe whether artificial intelligence is destroying jobs, by, for instance, replacing humans for some tasks, or creating jobs, perhaps by increasing productivity as it provides humans with the tools to do more tasks? MIT economist Daron Acemoglu summarizes research that he has conducted with his colleagues to answer this question.
Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow shares findings from research that explores how polarization has evolved during the coronavirus pandemic.
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Fact Sheets

High Skilled Immigration Reform

The United States immigration policy is the set of laws and provisions that regulates the entry and the stay of non-US citizens on national territory. High-skilled, college-educated immigrants contribute to scientific and technological innovation, entrepreneurship, and job-creation in the U.S.

Quote

Should a Morning Staff Meeting Feel Like Homeroom?

“What’s the point of coming in if none of your co-workers are there? If you have to force employees to do something you think is in their benefit, it’s not in their benefit.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford ​University

Nicholas Bloom
The New York Times
April 22, 2022

Featured Article

Competition Policy and Free Trade: Antitrust Provisions in PTAs

Why do preferential trade agreements (PTAs) include terms concerning antitrust or competition policy? Some argue that governments use competition policy to protect local firms against foreign competition. A better theory is that trade makes it hard for national authorities to enforce competition policy.

By: Anu Bradford, Tim Buthe