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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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TAP Blog

In their latest missive, Dean Matthew Slaughter and coauthor Matthew Rees underscore how unnecessarily costly America’s too-restrictive skilled-immigration policy is.
The Case for Patents, a new book by Northwestern University business and law professor Daniel Spulber, emphasizes the importance of incentives for invention, innovation, and technology adoption.
Professor Bennett Capers discusses his article, “Afrofuturism, Critical Race Theory, and Policing in the Year 2044,” and shares how his interests in literature, experience as a prosecutor, and his personal identity influence his scholarship.
Professor William Kerr, Harvard Business School, shares data on immigrant contributions, examines the important roles played by universities and firms, and provides suggestions for how the U.S. immigration policy could be improved.
Matthew Gentzkow, Stanford economist, discusses a recent paper that explores to what extent rising affective polarization has seen increases in the U.S. and other developed democracies.
Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow shares findings from recent research that explores how polarization has evolved during the coronavirus pandemic.
Brooklyn Law professor Frank Pasquale’s new book, New Laws of Robotics: Defending Human Expertise in the Age of AI, explores the ways that technological advances affect how we work, what media we consume, and how law is made and enforced; and he addresses the problems that arise when robots advance into hospitals, schools, and the military.
In their article, “How to Win with Machine Learning,” Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb explain how companies entering industries with an AI-enabled product or service can build a sustainable competitive advantage and raise entry barriers against latecomers.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, widely known for his research on remote work, shares his expertise about the ups and downs of working from home.
Erik Brynjolfsson and colleagues share findings from a study that looked at the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on remote work.
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Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

Remote work is a leveller — location doesn't matter. Only your internet does

So, people can end up working in silos, growing weaker at making new connections, which are actually very helpful in innovation. Unless we figure this out, there could be a long-run problem with innovation slipping.  — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
The Economic Times
February 20, 2021

Featured Article

Platforms and Ecosystems: Enabling the Digital Economy

Digital platforms alter the structure of markets and create complex business ecosystems. Platforms challenge traditional methods of management and regulation.

By: Marshall Van Alstyne, Arun Sundararajan, Michael G. Jacobides