Issues

Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

Back to main Innovation and Economic Growth page

TAP Blog

This is the first of six reports from the Mapping the Use of Facial Recognition in Public Spaces in Europe (MAPFRE) project. International law scholar, Professor Theodore Christakis, Université Grenoble Alpes, is the project leader.
Economics professors Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, BU, explain why the US and many industrialized countries are seeing rising wage inequality go hand in hand with modest productivity gains.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom is widely known for his research on remote work and best management practices. This post focuses on how the work-from-home transformation triggered by the pandemic is impacting city centers and suburbs.
Harvard’s Josh Lerner and Stanford’s Amit Seru share findings from their recent work with Nick Short and Yuan Sun to identify who the innovators and patent awardees are within the financial technology sector.
Harvard Business School’s Josh Lerner examines the underlying causes of the asset management industry’s low levels of minority ownership in the U.S. He shares findings from a new working paper cowritten with Johan Cassel and Emmanuel Yimfor.
Stanford professor Erik Brynjolfsson discusses the strengths of AI technology, the challenges of measuring the economic impact of the digital economy, and how digitally resilient companies were in a better position to thrive through the pandemic than others
UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.
Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom examines the pandemic-triggered migration away from large city centers (the donut effect) and the long-term challenges for city policymakers.
Matthew Gentzkow, Stanford economist, discusses a recent paper that explores to what extent rising affective polarization has seen increases in the U.S. and other developed democracies.
Can we observe whether artificial intelligence is destroying jobs, by, for instance, replacing humans for some tasks, or creating jobs, perhaps by increasing productivity as it provides humans with the tools to do more tasks? MIT economist Daron Acemoglu summarizes research that he has conducted with his colleagues to answer this question.
Results 11 - 20 of 243
|< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >|

Upcoming Events

There are currently no upcoming events for Innovation and Economic Growth. Please see our events calendar for all upcoming events.

Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

What We Know Now About the Business Impact of Hybrid Work

“But the biggest challenge—and maybe the one unexpected bit—is how much employees have got comfortable with choice of days in the office and like to flip that around each week, for whatever reason, childcare reasons, work, personal reasons, etc. ” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

Nicholas Bloom
Time
September 6, 2022

Featured Article

Envelope Modeling of Renewable Resource Variability and Capacity

The output of wind turbines and solar cells varies widely, making them hard to integrate into power grids. This paper develops a new method to assess contributions from these energy resources, emphasizing that evaluators should focus on matching supply with demand.

By: Geoffrey Parker, Ekundayo Shittu, Xiaoyue Jiang