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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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TAP Blog

A new study by MIT economic professor Erik Brynjolfsson and his colleagues Avinash Collis and Felix Eggers puts a dollar value on all those free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP someday.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
Professor Heidi Williams is lauded by The Economist for her pursuit of a "more rigorous understanding of technological progress in medicine and health care."
George Washington University law professor Daniel Solove provides his list of notable books on privacy and security from 2018.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue-in-cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2018.
Daron Acemoglu, MIT, and Pascual Restrepo, Boston University, argue that AI can be the basis of two types of technological progress: automation and enhancement; and they show that “there is scope for public policy to ensure that resources are allocated optimally between the two in order to ensure fulfillment of AI’s potential for growth, employment, and prosperity.”
Professors Woodrow Hartzog, Northeastern University School of Law, and Daniel Solove, George Washington University, share their expertise with the FTC during the Hearings Initiative on Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.
A report from Cornell Tech’s Speed Conference shares research in areas of autonomous vehicles, warfare, information security, labor and manufacturing, content moderation, and finance.
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Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

Remote work is a leveller — location doesn't matter. Only your internet does

So, people can end up working in silos, growing weaker at making new connections, which are actually very helpful in innovation. Unless we figure this out, there could be a long-run problem with innovation slipping.  — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
The Economic Times
February 20, 2021

Featured Article

The Economics of Markets and Platforms

Some economic models omit intermediaries, entrepreneurs, and other key factors in dynamic markets. The study of platforms like eBay and Etsy leads to the development of more realistic economic models.

By: Daniel Spulber