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Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland law professor and artificial intelligence (AI) expert, shares his thoughts on four new legally inspired rules that should be applied to robots and AI in our daily lives.
Matthew Slaughter, Dean of the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, discusses how place-based “heartland” visas could help arrest the decline of high-skilled workers in America.
The Economics of Artificial Intelligence: An Agenda, edited by Rotman School of Management professors Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb, seeks to set the agenda for the economic research on the impact of AI.
Mary Gray and Siddharth Suri’s new book, Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, explores the lives of people who are paid to train artificial intelligence and serve as “humans in the loop” delivering on-demand information services.
University of Florida law professor Daniel Sokol and Stanford University Fellow Chirantan Chatterjee examine the risk of cybersecurity vulnerabilities within merger and acquisition activity.
TAP Scholars Danielle Citron, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law, and Ryan Calo, University of Washington, examine the trend of automation in agency decision-making, and find the automation of the administrative state “deeply concerning”.
A new study by MIT economic professor Erik Brynjolfsson and his colleagues Avinash Collis and Felix Eggers puts a dollar value on all those free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP someday.
In their new article, “You Might Be a Robot,” Stanford law professors Mark Lemley and Bryan Casey offer a solution to the challenges of defining and legislating artificial intelligence: “laws should regulate behavior, not things”.
Artificial intelligence scholars Erik Brynjolfsson (MIT) and Kate Crawford (AI Now Institute) react to last week’s Executive Order outlining President Trump’s plan to support the development of artificial intelligence technology.
In “Regulating Bot Speech,” University of Washington robotics expert Ryan Calo and Madeline Lamo examine how mandatory disclosure laws that disallow bots to operate unless they identify themselves as non-human might fare under principles of free expression.
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Fact Sheets

Health Information Technology

“Health Information Technology” or Health IT encompasses a wide range of hardware and software products used by patients, doctors, pharmacies, hospitals, insurers or other participants in the healthcare ecosystem to process and store data and communications related to health care.

Quote

Should a Morning Staff Meeting Feel Like Homeroom?

“What’s the point of coming in if none of your co-workers are there? If you have to force employees to do something you think is in their benefit, it’s not in their benefit.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford ​University

Nicholas Bloom
The New York Times
April 22, 2022

Featured Article

Competition Policy and Free Trade: Antitrust Provisions in PTAs

Why do preferential trade agreements (PTAs) include terms concerning antitrust or competition policy? Some argue that governments use competition policy to protect local firms against foreign competition. A better theory is that trade makes it hard for national authorities to enforce competition policy.

By: Anu Bradford, Tim Buthe