Issues

Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Quotes

Small Tech Stocks Soar as the Future Arrives Early

“When it comes to remote work in particular, the past 10 weeks have seen more changes than we’ve seen in the previous 20 years. We haven’t seen anything like it since World War II” — Erik Brynjolfsson, Director, Digital Economy Lab at Stanford University


Erik Brynjolfsson
Source: The New York Times
September 17, 2020

The Future of the Office: Covid-19 Has Forced a Radical Shift in Working Habits

They found that those who worked from home were more productive (they processed more calls). One-third of the increase was due to having a quieter environment. The rest was due to people working more hours. Sick days for employees plummeted. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: The Economist
September 12, 2020

App-Based Contact Tracing Has Been a Bust. Apple Wants to Try Something New.

“I don’t know that adoption is going to be good enough nor even that adoption is the biggest hurdle. Absent a real sea change in the way that we address the disease, [native support] is not likely to overcome the problems.” — Ryan Calo, Professor of Law, University of Washington
M. Ryan Calo
Source: Slate
September 10, 2020

A Super-surveillance Society and Its Impact on Democracy

No country with too strong or too weak state power can generate economic growth. — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economics, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
Source: The Japan Times
September 6, 2020

Why the Future of Work Might Be ‘Hybrid’

Once the pandemic subsides, working from home two days a week will be optimal for balancing collaborative and quiet work, while benefitting from the reduced stress of less commuting. Companies that want to retain their own space consider moving from tall buildings to spread-out industrial parks or campuses to facilitate social distancing. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: BBC News
August 30, 2020

Working from Home Raises Questions About U.S. Inequality: Fed Panel

“Working from home really risks a big increase in inequality.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: Reuters
August 20, 2020

Why Organizations Might Want to Design and Train Less-Than-Perfect AI

“There may be times when—even if the AI can make a better decision than the human—you might still want to let humans be in charge because that motivates them to pay attention.” — Susan Athey, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Susan Athey
Source: Fast Company
August 5, 2020

Why Silicon Valley’s Biggest Companies Are Investing Billions in India

“Much as it pains me to say it, the US isn't nearly as attractive a place for innovation as it was five years ago,” — Mark Lemley, Director of the Stanford Program in Law, Science and Technology, Stanford University
Mark Lemley
Source: CNN Business
July 17, 2020

End of the Office: The Quiet, Grinding Loneliness of Working from Home

“Working from home might boost productivity for a while, “but it’s so costly in terms of creativity and inspiration.” — Nick Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: The Guardian
July 14, 2020

What We Owe Essential Workers

“When technology makes labor critical to the production process, workers’ bargaining power will necessarily increase.” — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economocs, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
Source: Project Syndicate
July 6, 2020
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TAP Blog

An Early Look at the U.S. Data Regarding COVID-19 and Remote Work

Erik Brynjolfsson and colleagues share findings from a study that looked at the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on remote work.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Featured Article

SIRI-OUSLY 2.0: What Artificial Intelligence Reveals about the First Amendment

Machines that can actually think are referred to as strong Artificial intelligence (AI). The First Amendment might protect speech by strong AI. Courts focused on the value of speech to listeners and the need to constrain government power will be sympathetic to this view.

By: Margot Kaminski, Helen Norton, Toni M. Massaro