Issues

Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

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Quotes

Why the Future of Work Might Be ‘Hybrid’

Once the pandemic subsides, working from home two days a week will be optimal for balancing collaborative and quiet work, while benefitting from the reduced stress of less commuting. Companies that want to retain their own space consider moving from tall buildings to spread-out industrial parks or campuses to facilitate social distancing. — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: BBC News
August 30, 2020

Working from Home Raises Questions About U.S. Inequality: Fed Panel

“Working from home really risks a big increase in inequality.” — Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: Reuters
August 20, 2020

Why Organizations Might Want to Design and Train Less-Than-Perfect AI

“There may be times when—even if the AI can make a better decision than the human—you might still want to let humans be in charge because that motivates them to pay attention.” — Susan Athey, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Susan Athey
Source: Fast Company
August 5, 2020

Why Silicon Valley’s Biggest Companies Are Investing Billions in India

“Much as it pains me to say it, the US isn't nearly as attractive a place for innovation as it was five years ago,” — Mark Lemley, Director of the Stanford Program in Law, Science and Technology, Stanford University
Mark Lemley
Source: CNN Business
July 17, 2020

End of the Office: The Quiet, Grinding Loneliness of Working from Home

“Working from home might boost productivity for a while, “but it’s so costly in terms of creativity and inspiration.” — Nick Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: The Guardian
July 14, 2020

What We Owe Essential Workers

“When technology makes labor critical to the production process, workers’ bargaining power will necessarily increase.” — Daron Acemoglu, Professor of Economocs, MIT
Daron Acemoglu
Source: Project Syndicate
July 6, 2020

Pandemic Stress-tests Platform Power

“Platforms such as Uber, Airbnb, and Eventbrite saw demand evaporate, and they could not easily pivot. Their transportation, hospitality, and conference services required too much human contact to endure social distancing and shelter-in-place mandates.” — Geoffrey Parker, Professor of Engineering, Dartmouth College, and Marshall Van Alstyne, Professor of Information Systems & Management, Boston University
Geoffrey Parker
Source: Medium
July 1, 2020

Downturns Tend to Reduce Gender Inequality. Not Under Covid-19

“Industries involving face-to-face interaction, such as hospitality, have suffered most. In America health care and education have not been spared, with five times as many women losing their jobs as men.”
 — Nicholas Bloom, William Eberle Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: The Economist
June 15, 2020

Many Jobs May Vanish Forever as Layoffs Mount

“I hate to say it, but this is going to take longer and look grimmer than we thought.”
— Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas Bloom
Source: The New York Times
May 21, 2020

Everyone Wins from Vaccine Cooperation

“More than any other single intervention, a widely distributed, effective vaccine would allow the world economy to restart. With $375 billion in global wealth evaporating each month, that moment cannot come soon enough.”
— Susan Athey, Professor of Economics and Technology, Stanford University


Susan Athey
Source: Project Syndicate
May 14, 2020
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TAP Blog

Carl Shapiro Critiques the FTC’s Withdrawal of 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines

UC Berkeley economics professor Carl Shapiro argues that the Federal Trade Commission’s withdrawal of its 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines relies on specious economic arguments regarding elimination of double marginalization.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

High Skilled Immigration Reform

The United States immigration policy is the set of laws and provisions that regulates the entry and the stay of non-US citizens on national territory. High-skilled, college-educated immigrants contribute to scientific and technological innovation, entrepreneurship, and job-creation in the U.S.

Featured Article

Soft Law: New Tools for Governing Emerging Technologies

Traditionally, nations harmonized their own regulation of new technologies with the rules of other nations through negotiation of international treaties. "Soft law" tools such as private standards and codes of conduct are less resource-intensive than treaties.

By: Braden Allenby, Gary Marchant