Issues

Innovation and Economic Growth

Researchers today are trying to understand how information technology affects innovation, productivity, and economic growth while studying the impact of political and legal ground rules. Academics featured here are looking at the potential to create jobs and keep policymakers aware of emerging trends in technology.

Back to main Innovation and Economic Growth page

Upcoming Events

Thirteenth Annual Conference on Innovation Economics

Searle Center on Law, Regulation, and Economic Growth event

June 11, 2020, Chicago, IL

CCP 16th Annual Conference 2020: Vertical Restraints: Updating for the Digital Dimension

Presented by the Centre for Competition Policy

July 9, 2020, London, UK

The 2nd Tokenomics Conference

Presented by the Toulouse School of Economics

October 26, 2020, Toulouse, France

TAP Blog

Ryan Calo: Contact-Tracing Applications Pose Significant Risks

University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo and his colleagues Ashkan Soltani (independent privacy researcher and technologist), and Carl Bergstrom (University of Washington biology professor) delved into the feasibility of whether contact-tracing apps can be effective and safeguard individuals’ privacy.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) refers to technologies that perform learning and reasoning in ways that simulate human cognitive abilities.

Quote

How Will COVID-19 Change the World by 2025? How Remote Learning Changes Education

"To close the digital divide, the federal government needs to view broadband like the US Postal Service when it was first developed, concentrating on connecting all citizens rather than just communities where the service makes economic sense." — Randal Picker, Professor of Law, University of Chicago

Randal Picker
Futurity
May 6, 2020

Featured Article

Artificial Intelligence, Automation, and Work

Automation tends to displace human workers, reducing wages by reducing the demand for labor. But automation also increases productivity and creates new-labor intensive tasks. Several factors constrain the labor market’s capacity to adjust, especially if automation proceeds too quickly.

By: Daron Acemoglu, Pascual Restrepo