Intellectual Property

Copyright and Trademark

Copyrights and trademark are both types of intellectual property (IP). Copyright is a legal term describing rights given to creators for their literary and artistic works. A trademark provides protection to the owner of the mark by ensuring the exclusive right to use it to identify goods or services, or to authorize another to use it in return for payment.

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Quotes

Google Books Deal Bolsters Dream of Universal Bookstore

"The publishers have embraced the digital transition in books; Google is now a player and partner in that ecosystem, rather than a dangerous disruptive presence." — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, New York University


James Grimmelmann
Source: Time
October 7, 2012

Publishers Double Down


James Grimmelmann
Source: Inside Higher Ed
September 11, 2012

Reforming Copyright Is Possible


Pamela Samuelson
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education
July 9, 2012

A Universal Digital Library Is Within Reach


Pamela Samuelson
Source: The Los Angeles Times
May 1, 2012

IP Lawyers Meet Tupac's Hologram


M. Ryan Calo
Source: Daily Business Review
April 25, 2012
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TAP Blog

Pamela Samuelson Pushes Back on Stricter Copyright ISP Liability Rules

Berkeley law professor Pamela Samuelson’s recent article examines proposed reforms of the DMCA’s safe harbor rules that limit the liability of ISPs hosting user-generated content. Professor Samuelson urges Congress to “take a balanced approach” and “consider the interests of a wide range of stakeholders”.

TAP Staff Blogger

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Fact Sheets

Piracy and IP Enforcement

In the context of technology, “piracy” is a colloquial term for the illegal copying of copyrighted works. The related problem of counterfeiting is the illegal reproduction of patented or trademarked products.

Featured Article

Law, Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality

Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) will be widely used for social and commercial purposes. AR and VR will sometimes be used to harm others, testing the limits of criminal, civil, and constitutional law.

By: Mark Lemley, Eugene Volokh