Intellectual Property

Patents

A patent provides protection for an invention to the owner of the patent. The protection is granted for a limited period, generally 20 years. Patent protection means that the invention cannot be commercially made, used, distributed or sold without the patent owner's consent.

TAP Blog

Where Are the Fintech Innovators?

Harvard’s Josh Lerner and Stanford’s Amit Seru share findings from their recent work with Nick Short and Yuan Sun to identify who the innovators and patent awardees are within the financial technology sector.

Josh Lerner and Amit Seru

Upcoming Events

There are currently no upcoming events about this Issue. Please see our events calendar for all upcoming events.

Fact Sheets

Software Patents

A patent provides an exclusive legal right to an invention for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of that innovation. As with other property rights, patents may be sold, transferred, or licensed for a third party’s use.

Quote

Changing U.S. Patent Policy on Tech Standards Stirs Concerns

"The best way to resolve this issue is not to change policy approaches." — Mark Lemley, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Mark Lemley
Bloomberg Law
December 26, 2018

Featured Article

A Toolkit of Policies to Promote Innovation

Innovation is an important route to continued productivity growth in the United States. Tax credits for research and development (R&D) are among the best ways to spur innovation. Evidence as to whether the patent system promotes innovation is inconclusive.

By: Heidi Williams, John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom