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Intellectual Property

Intellectual property (IP) rights help creators limit who uses their work without giving value in return. This protection encourages innovation in thought and expression. Academics featured on this site research topics such as open source licensing, digital rights management, patent reform, IP and technical standards, trademarks, and trade secrets.

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TAP Blog

This edition of IP Colloquium sets out to understand the first sale doctrine, tracing its public policy justifications and comparing copyright's approach to that of antitrust.
Lawrence Lessig's talk will explore copyright in a digital age, and the importance of a doctrine like fair use for free expression on the Internet.
On Thursday, February 18, the federal court considering the proposed Google Books settlement held an all-day fairness hearing. In addition to the authors, publishers, and Google arguing in favor of the settlement, the court heard from the Department of Justice and twenty-six supporters and opponents of the settlement. Over the course of the day, the "opt-out" nature of the settlement emerged as perhaps _the_ critical issue facing the court.
Last summer, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society hosted several presentations on the Google Book Search Settlement. With today’s fairness hearing on this case, TAP is providing links into the podcasts from the Berkman Center.
On Thursday, a federal district court in New York will conduct the fairness hearing in the Google Book Search class-action case. All of the filings are in --hundreds of them-- and we are now fully ready to hear from Judge Denny Chin. What should we be looking for?
Secondary markets for buying and selling patents are an important yet understudied phenomenon. Do patent markets promote efficiency in the development of new technologies? Or, do they set the stage for patent hold-ups? To investigate these questions, the University of Michigan held a one-day research symposium with industry leaders and innovation scholars. Review the conference materials.
This week, TAP features the work of Professor Glenn Ellison.
Professor Joshua Wright explores the limits of antitrust in the context of patent holdup.
Harvard Business School professor on the changing world of venture capital.
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Fact Sheets

Patent Reform

A patent is an exclusive legal right to own and market an invention or improvement for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of the invention.

Quote

Lofi Girl Disappeared from YouTube and Reignited Debate Over Bogus Copyright Claims

“We ended up with this system because in the 1990s, when the contours of the internet and copyright are still coming into view, this is the compromise that representatives of the copyright industries and the internet industries worked out.” — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, Cornell University

James Grimmelmann
NPR
July 16, 2022

Featured Article

A Toolkit of Policies to Promote Innovation

Innovation is an important route to continued productivity growth in the United States. Tax credits for research and development (R&D) are among the best ways to spur innovation. Evidence as to whether the patent system promotes innovation is inconclusive.

By: Heidi Williams, John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom