Issues

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property (IP) rights help creators limit who uses their work without giving value in return. This protection encourages innovation in thought and expression. Academics featured on this site research topics such as open source licensing, digital rights management, patent reform, IP and technical standards, trademarks, and trade secrets.

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TAP Blog

MIT economics professor Heidi Williams reviews recent US Supreme Court rulings on patent eligibility and presents her rigorous empirical research on the question: do patents impede or encourage innovation?
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman examines a paradox presented in the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA): while the DTSA provides an important development in intellectual property law, the statute says it “shall not be construed to be a law pertaining to intellectual property for purposes of any other Act of Congress.”
Professor Colleen Chien has been recognized by the American Law Institute due to her “work in intellectual property law [that] has already helped shape governmental policy around innovation.”
Cornell law professor James Grimmelmann provides an overview of Judge Gorsuch’s opinions from IP and Internet law cases. Justice Neil Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court.
Eric Goldman, Professor of Law at Santa Clara University, provides a look back at the events that had the greatest impact on Internet law.
Law Professor James Grimmelmann, Cornell Tech and Cornell Law School, shares insights from a symposium on computer-authored works.
Professor Pamela Samuelson, University of California, Berkeley, explains why Google’s win in the Oracle v. Google case is valuable for all software developers as well as the general public.
Two papers by Professor Daniel Spulber look at the interplay of the economic benefit of patents and the public policies that impact the development of innovation.
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman discusses the recently passed Defend Trade Secrets Act its major consequences on intellectual property law and the economy.
How do technology companies actually use intellectual property? This is the final report in a 7-part series of posts from The 20th Annual BCLT/BTLJ Symposium.
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Fact Sheets

Patent Reform

A patent is an exclusive legal right to own and market an invention or improvement for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of the invention.

Quote

Google’s Supreme Court Faceoff with Oracle Was a Disaster for Google

There's a real chance the Supreme Court could focus on this issue [the copyright status of APIs] in its decision—perhaps sending the case back down to the lower courts for even more litigation. — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, Cornell Tech and Cornell Law School

James Grimmelmann
Ars Technica
October 8, 2020

Featured Article

Law, Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality

Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) will be widely used for social and commercial purposes. AR and VR will sometimes be used to harm others, testing the limits of criminal, civil, and constitutional law.

By: Mark Lemley, Eugene Volokh