Issues

Intellectual Property

Intellectual property (IP) rights help creators limit who uses their work without giving value in return. This protection encourages innovation in thought and expression. Academics featured on this site research topics such as open source licensing, digital rights management, patent reform, IP and technical standards, trademarks, and trade secrets.

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Upcoming Events

Berkeley–NYU-Symposium-on-The-Impact-of-the-Patent-System-on-Markets-or-Technology

Hosted by the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology

February 23, 2023, Berkeley, CA

From the DMCA to the DSA: A Transatlantic Dialogue on Online Platform Liability and Copyright Law

Hosted by the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology

April 6, 2023, Berkeley, CA

TAP Blog

Recent Papers from TAP Scholars Delve into AI’s Impact on Tech-policy Issues

Introduction to several recent articles by TAP scholars that explore the impact of artificial intelligence technologies on gender equity, algorithmic decision-making, cost and rating collusion, free speech, and trade secrecy.

TAP Staff Blogger

Fact Sheets

Software Patents

A patent provides an exclusive legal right to an invention for a limited period of time, in exchange for public disclosure of that innovation. As with other property rights, patents may be sold, transferred, or licensed for a third party’s use.

Quote

Lofi Girl Disappeared from YouTube and Reignited Debate Over Bogus Copyright Claims

“We ended up with this system because in the 1990s, when the contours of the internet and copyright are still coming into view, this is the compromise that representatives of the copyright industries and the internet industries worked out.” — James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, Cornell University

James Grimmelmann
NPR
July 16, 2022

Featured Article

Extended Collective Licensing to Enable Mass Digitization: A Critique of the U.S. Copyright Office Proposal

The Copyright Office has proposed that an extended collective license (ECL) be created to allow mass digitization of some copyrighted works. For several reasons, the Copyright Office plan is not workable.

By: Pamela Samuelson