Internet

Media and Content

The easy availability of information on the Internet may lead to the commoditization of content. However, if content is free or low cost, it may be difficult for those who produce it (like journalists) to earn a living. Economists and other scholars examine this tension and suggest various solutions.

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TAP Blog

Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology philosophy professor, talks with journalist Clive Thompson about how the media covers responsible uses of technology.
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman shares key takeaways from his new paper addressing the wide range of content moderation options that lie between “leave up” and “remove.”
Professor Daniel Solove, George Washington University, explains why he believes Section 230 “…should be restored to its original meaning and purpose – a much more limited scope than it has now.” He discusses how recovering distributor liability would promote greater responsibility for platforms and ISPs.
Harvard professor Jonathan Zittrain shares several years of thinking around digital governance during his talk at the 2020 Tanner Lecture on Human Values. His two-part lecture, titled “Gaining Power, Losing Control,” reflects on how technology has empowered humanity, and yet in many ways, we have less and less control.
Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman shares an op-ed piece he recently wrote that discusses Section 230 and the legislative efforts to modify or repeal it.
Take a look at the top viewed blog posts from this past year that have been written by TAP scholars.
Professor Eric Goldman, Santa Clara High Tech Law Institute, provides a narrated and selective bibliography on Section 230.
University of Washington law professor Ryan Calo discusses what steps social media companies and the government can legally take to stop the spread of misinformation, while also ensuring that everyone has the right to express their opinion.
Stanford economist Matthew Gentzkow presents his findings that deactivating Facebook leaves people less informed but happier.
Political scientist Elizabeth Dekeyser, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST), uses a machine-learning tool to analyze Twitter responses to the 2015 Paris killings, showing that state policies can sway sympathy for terror attacks.
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Fact Sheets

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Quote

Facebook Ends Ban on Political Advertising

“When you ban all campaign ads on the most accessible and affordable platform out there, you tilt the balance toward the candidates who can afford radio and television.” — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia

Siva Vaidhyanathan
The New York Times
March 6, 2021

Featured Article

Hero or Villain: The Data Controller in Privacy Law and Technologies

By embracing privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), privacy law can better protect individuals from surveillance and other intrusions. Trusting data controllers leaves privacy vulnerable to a single point of failure.

By: Omer Tene, Claudia Diaz, Seda Gürses