Internet

Media and Content

The easy availability of information on the Internet may lead to the commoditization of content. However, if content is free or low cost, it may be difficult for those who produce it (like journalists) to earn a living. Economists and other scholars examine this tension and suggest various solutions.

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Boston University law professor Danielle Citron shares how the use of deepfake technology to manipulate video and audio for malicious purposes is becoming a real threat.
Data & Society Founder and Microsoft Principal Researcher danah boyd appeared on PBS’ Amanpour & Co. to discuss media manipulation with Hari Sreenivasan.
Joshua Gans, Rotman School of Management, shares key takeaways from a report he co-authored with colleagues on the Committee for the Study of Digital Platforms (at the Stigler Center at the University of Chicago). The report addresses the challenges arising from digital platforms and their impact on the news media, and offers policy recommendations.
A new study by MIT economic professor Erik Brynjolfsson and his colleagues Avinash Collis and Felix Eggers puts a dollar value on all those free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP someday.
Harvard cyber and international law professor Jonathan Zittrain talks with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about privacy, autonomy, and information fiduciaries.
Privacy law expert Danielle Citron and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law are hosting a symposium to discuss the full array of implications that “deep fakes” have on our society.
For the past couple of years, Santa Clara University law professor Eric Goldman has been delving into all things emojis. This post rounds up all of his work on emojis and the law to date.
University of Virginia media studies professor Siva Vaidhyanathan discusses his new book, Antisocial Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy.
Columbia law professor Tim Wu, who was a senior advisor at the Federal Trade Commission in 2012 when the agency settled with Facebook for failing to protect user privacy, discusses Facebook’s privacy promises then and now.
UC Berkeley law professor Chris Hoofnagle explains how and why platforms, such as Facebook, pay developers with your personal data.
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Quote

Social Media Giants Brace for Lawsuits Thanks to Texas Anti-Censorship Law

“A big flood of lawsuits is expected against the social media platforms if HB 20 remains in effect. The Texas plaintiff lawyers will be pretty fired up.” — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University

Eric Goldman
Washington Examiner
May 20, 2022

Featured Article

Hero or Villain: The Data Controller in Privacy Law and Technologies

By embracing privacy enhancing technologies (PETs), privacy law can better protect individuals from surveillance and other intrusions. Trusting data controllers leaves privacy vulnerable to a single point of failure.

By: Omer Tene, Claudia Diaz, Seda Gürses