Internet

Media and Content

The easy availability of information on the Internet may lead to the commoditization of content. However, if content is free or low cost, it may be difficult for those who produce it (like journalists) to earn a living. Economists and other scholars examine this tension and suggest various solutions.

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Quotes

Opinion: The Law That Shaped the Internet Presents a Question for Elon Musk

[Twitter] can turn the content moderation up and please liberals or turn it down and please conservatives and libertarians, but “there’s no place on that slider that will make all the partisans happy.” — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: The New York Times
April 15, 2022

Elon Musk has a plan for Twitter. It may scare away users and advertisers.

“He's never been in this business. He’s been in a scattershot of businesses that have nothing to do with media or communication.” — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia


Siva Vaidhyanathan
Source: NBC News
April 15, 2022

Facebook’s Unglamorous Mistakes

“It’s time to stop pretending like this is so different from other types of societal harms” — Ryan Calo, Professor of Law, University of Washington


M. Ryan Calo
Source: The New York Times
January 19, 2022

Leaks Just Exposed How Toxic Facebook and Instagram Are to Teen Girls and, Well, Everyone

“In short, the problem with Facebook is Facebook.” — Siva Vaidhyanathan, Professor of Modern Media Studies, University of Virginia


Siva Vaidhyanathan
Source: The Guardian
September 18, 2021

Texas Governor Signs Bill Prohibiting Social Media Giants from Blocking Users Based on Viewpoint

“Even if it’s struck down, it’s a symptom of a much bigger structural problem we have in the country that politicians think this is how they should be spending their time.” — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: The Washington Post
September 9, 2021

Lawmakers, Taking Aim at Big Tech, Push Sweeping Overhaul of Antitrust

“This is a reaction to the fact that our antitrust laws have been construed so narrowly by the Supreme Court. Because of this problem, it is very appropriate for Congress to be stepping in to prohibit and determine what’s bad and what’s good for markets.” — Eleanor M. Fox, Professor of Law, New York University
Eleanor Fox
Source: The New York Times
June 11, 2021

How Websites Use "Dark Patterns" to Manipulate You

“This is a classic obstruction dark pattern — we're making it a little bit more painful, we're sucking up a little bit of their free time if they want to say no.” — Lior Strahilevitz , Professor of Law, University of Chicago


Lior Strahilevitz
Source: CBS News
May 14, 2021

Can the FTC Stop the Tech Industry’s Use of ‘Dark Patterns’?

“There’s no backlash for companies that employ these techniques, if our results are externally valid. They can employ just a couple of dark patterns and get away with it.” — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago
Lior Strahilevitz
Source: Fast Company
May 6, 2021

Snapchat Can Be Sued Over Role In Fatal Car Crash, Court Rules

“I don't think that this opinion actually will open up the Pandora's Box of saying, 'You can sue a website for how it's designed under all circumstances” — Eric Goldman, Professor of Law, Santa Clara University


Eric Goldman
Source: NPR: Technology
May 4, 2021

Stopping the Manipulation Machines

“Everyone is frustrated with dark patterns. Companies are taking a calculated risk that they won’t get caught doing deceptive things because there is no consistent enforcement mechanism for this.” — Lior Strahilevitz, Professor of Law, University of Chicago
Lior Strahilevitz
Source: The New York Times
April 30, 2021
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Featured Article

The Sharing Economy and the Edges of Contract Law: Comparing U.S. and U.K. Approaches

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By: Miriam A. Cherry